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Disney said there are ads now running on Disney channels that would not meet the new standards. Two Kraft products won’t make the cut: Oscar Mayer Lunchables, some of which have 28 percent of the recommended daily sodium intake, and Capri Sun, which has just 60 calories per serving but has added sweeteners.

Disney declined to name other companies’ offerings, but said most sugary cereals won’t be allowed.

Kraft said it welcomed Disney’s decision, noting that it advertises very few brands to children under age 12.

Margo Wootan, nutrition policy director at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said that while some snack foods of limited nutritional value may still be advertised, the worst of the junk foods will be eliminated under the new policy.

Disney’s announcement really puts a lot of pressure on Nickelodeon and Cartoon Network and other media to do the same,” she added.

A spokesman for Nickelodeon declined to comment.

Disney launched internal nutrition guidelines in 2006, with the goal of making 85 percent of its consumer food and drink products healthy. The remaining 15 percent was reserved for special treats, such as cakes for birthday celebrations. The company also stopped using toys in kid’s meals to advertise its movies.

Disney on Tuesday also introduced its “Mickey Check” seal of approval for nutritious foods sold in stores, online and at its parks and resorts.

“The emotional connection kids have to our characters and stories gives us a unique opportunity to continue to inspire and encourage them to lead healthier lives,” Iger said.

The Better Business Bureau and 16 major food companies, including Coca-Cola Co., Burger King Worldwide Holdings Inc. and Mars Inc. have also pledged to ensure by 2014 that ads aimed at children are devoted only to better-for-you foods.

McDonald’s, which is part of the initiative, said in a statement Tuesday that it will continue a dialogue with Disney about its new guidelines.