Continued from page 1

“The same issues I’m out there campaigning on against Gov. Romney are the same issues I’m going to campaign against Barack Obama on,” Mr. Santorum said on ABC’s “This Week.”

“The government overreach in health care, and cap and trade, trying to control the manufacturing and energy sector of the economy. … Unfortunately, Gov. Romney and Barack Obama are in the same place,” he said.

Mr. Santorum began the day by saying he was in the race “for the long haul,” but he sidestepped the question of whether he would fight Mr. Romney all the way to the Republican convention in August.

Mr. Romney, meanwhile, told “Fox News Sunday” that a winning Republican candidate can’t run a “shoestring” campaign and expect to beat the incumbent president.

“In a campaign, one of the things you recognize from Day One, is that you need to organize a financial operation to make sure you can run the campaign,” Mr. Romney said.

The former Massachusetts governor has not been shy about outspending his fellow Republican challengers. His campaign has raised about $63 million and spent about $55 million, according to Fox News.

Mr. Santorum, however, said Sunday that Mr. Romney’s inability, despite his fundraising prowess, to put away his GOP rivals for the nomination is a red flag.

“This is a primary process where somebody had a huge advantage, huge money advantage, huge advantage of establishment support, and he hasn’t been able to close … even come close to closing the deal. That tells you that there’s a real flaw there,” the candidate said on ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday.

With 1,144 delegates needed to claim the nomination, the win in Puerto Rico puts Mr. Romney’s delegate haul at 521. Mr. Santorum is second with 253, Newt Gingrich has 136 and Rep. Ron Paul of Texas has 50, according to the Associated Press.

With 44 percent of the ballots counted, Mr. Romney received 83 percent of the territory’s vote to Mr. Santorum’s 8 percent, Mr. Gingrich’s 2 percent and Mr. Paul’s 1 percent. Because Mr. Romney won a majority, Puerto Rican election officials said he would receive all 20 pledged delegates.

The wire service reported that voter turnout was light on the predominantly Catholic island, with officials predicting that about 150,000 people cast ballots.

Francisco Rodriguez, a 76-year-old architect, told the AP he was backing Mr. Romney in part because “he has a stronger connection to Puerto Rico and that will help us in the process of becoming a state.”

He had kind words for Mr. Santorum, describing him as a “person of faith, a good Catholic.” But he said he thinks the former senator hurt himself with his statements that English would have to be the official language if the U.S. territory were to seek statehood.

“In Puerto Rico, we get along fine with both languages,” Mr. Rodriguez said.

After Tuesday’s contest in Illinois, the battleground shifts to Saturday’s primary in Louisiana.

Story Continues →