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Born in 1881, Sachs was a dentist who began collecting posters while in high school. By 1905, he was Germany’s leading private poster collector and later launched the art publication “Das Plakat (The Poster).”

After the seizure of the posters in the summer, Sachs was arrested during the Nov. 9, 1938, pogrom against the Jews known as Kristallnacht and thrown in the Sachsenhausen concentration camp north of Berlin.

When he was released about two weeks later, the family fled to the United States.

After the war, Sachs assumed the collection had been destroyed and accepted compensation of about 225,000 German marks (then worth about $50,000) from West Germany in 1961.

He learned five years later, however, that part of the collection had survived the war and been turned over to an East Berlin museum. He wrote the communist authorities about seeing the posters or even bringing an exhibit to the West to no avail. He died in 1974 without seeing them again.

The posters became part of the German Historical Museum’s collection in 1990 after the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall.

Mr. Sachs has said he only learned of the existence of the collection in 2005, and began fighting then for their return.

When he receives the posters, Mr. Sachs will repay the compensation his father received, Mr. Druba said. He said it was not yet clear what the amount would be in current terms.