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The Jaguars and general manager Gene Smith showed little interest in Tebow coming out of college in 2010, even though he grew up in Jacksonville and starred at nearby Florida. They passed on Tebow with the No. 10 pick, instead selecting defensive tackle Tyson Alualu. Tebow went to Denver at No. 25.

Last season, Jacksonville traded up to draft Blaine Gabbert and called him a “franchise quarterback.” Gabbert struggled mightily, and the team blamed his problems on receivers and coaching.

Coach Jack Del Rio was fired in November, the same day the team was sold to Illinois businessman Shahid Khan. Before the Super Bowl, Khan said in a radio interview that he would have drafted Tebow and indicated he would consider bringing in Tebow if he became available.

“I share your sentiment,” Khan said to a caller who said he hoped the Jaguars would consider Tebow. “When is the next time Jacksonville is gonna have an athlete like Tim Tebow?”

So it’s pretty clear that any interest the Jaguars have in Tebow is coming from the owner and not the front office. Although the Jaguars haven’t blacked out a home game since 2009, they have had trouble filling the stadium while missing the playoffs 10 of the last 12 years.

Tebow certainly would help, even if he’s brought in to boost ticket sales and make the franchise relevant nationally for the first time since beating Pittsburgh in the playoffs in 2008.

But Jacksonville has no pressing need for another quarterback. The Jaguars signed Chad Henne to be the team’s backup last week and have Dan LeFevour on the roster.

The Jets, too, have a few quarterbacks on the roster.

The Jets signed Stanton last week to be their No. 2 quarterback, ahead of Greg McElroy, the team’s seventh-round draft pick last year. General manager Mike Tannenbaum said Tuesday that he was confident in the trio, but added: “I’ll give you my standard answer, which is you never know if other opportunities present themselves. We’ll always look at it. That’s the standard line there, but we feel good about Greg, Drew and Mark, and see where we go from there.”

On Tuesday, Sanchez spoke highly of both Tebow and Manning on Fox Sports Radio in Los Angeles.

“I think Peyton is going to do great, and I think Tim is going to do great no matter what happens,” Sanchez said on “The Petros & Money Show.” “He can learn from one of the best quarterbacks to ever play or he moves on somewhere else and uses his skills at another ball club. He definitely has talent. He knows how to win. He knows how to impact players, so both guys are really in a good situation. It’ll work out for both of them.”

The effect Tebow’s presence would have on Sanchez remains to be seen. The Jets appear to be committed to him financially as their starter for at least the next two years, but a restless fan base that got down on Sanchez as he struggled late last season could call for Tebow to take over at the first sign of trouble.

Two minutes after the Jets posted the trade on its Facebook page, there were 874 “likes,” 366 comments and 247 shares. Most of the comments ran along the lines of: “I might cry” and “He is not welcome here, another terrible decision.”

Tebow’s days were numbered in Denver when Manning chose the Broncos as his next destination. They are two entirely different quarterbacks and it made little sense to keep Tebow as a backup because the Broncos were going to have a vastly different offense under Manning, one of the most precise passers in league history.

Elway and Broncos coach John Fox called Tebow on Monday night to tell him it was possible he would be traded.

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