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“I have such a passion for hitting,” Jones said last month. “I’m kind of a one-track-mind kind of guy. I can’t have my hands in a bunch jars and be delegating responsibility for a bunch of different areas. I’d much rather stay focused on just one area and be able to do that well. While I think I could manage, I really don’t have the urge to manage. I’d much rather be a hitting coach than a manager.”

Jones, the top overall pick in the 1990 draft, was initially pegged to join the Braves’ lineup four years later as a left fielder. But he suffered a season-ending knee injury in spring training, delaying his debut.

What a debut it was.

Back at his natural infield position in 1995, Jones finished second in the NL rookie of the year balloting and helped the Braves win their first World Series title in Atlanta.

That remains his only championship, even though the Braves kept right on winning the NL East through 2005 in an unprecedented streak of 14 straight division titles. Jones was on teams that lost to the Yankees in the 1996 and ‘99 World Series.

After the team slumped for a couple of years, Jones was joined by a new generation of players who led the Braves back to the postseason in 2010 _ the final year of Cox’s long tenure as manager. Atlanta lost to the eventual champion San Francisco Giants in a tightly fought division series that Jones missed, having gone down in August with the second season-ending knee injury of his career.

Now, the Braves have one more chance to send Jones into retirement with a second World Series title.

“He’s had 18 remarkable years,” Schuerholz said, “and I hope his 19th is his most remarkable.”

Injuries were an unfortunate hindrance to Jones’ career, preventing him from reaching 500 homers. In addition to the two major knee operations, Jones had to deal with nagging ailments since 2004. This spring, he reported in top shape but his legs tightened, leading him to question whether he could even make it through the season.

“There’s not a day goes by that I don’t take some kind of pill or injection … to help me go out there,” he said.

When Jones was healthy, he was one of game’s most feared hitters. His best season was 1999, when he won the MVP award with a .319 average, a career-leading 45 homers and 110 RBIs. Nine years later, at 36, he won his first batting title with a career-high .364 average, which remains the last of his 10 seasons hitting above .300.

Despite his impressive power numbers, Jones always considered average to be the most important statistic.

“You’re never going to convince me I can’t hit .300-plus,” he said. “Hitting .300 _ that’s my benchmark.”

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Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963

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