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The sisters were friendly and often told stories of their singing adventures. They told Mitchell they had performed at Yosemite National Park and when their mother came to visit from Oregon, they all dined at Mitchell’s home.

But the sisters were also guarded. When Mitchell urged them to join a community choir, they declined. They never discussed their social lives.

“They kept things to themselves,” Mitchell said. “I don’t even know if they had siblings.”

The sisters grew up in Portland, Ore., before moving to the San Francisco area, where Joan Miller attended college, Harwood learned. The women briefly appeared on a 1950s television show called the “The Hoffman Hayride” and posed for a picture with Crosby as children. The twins also entertained troops at military bases, a childhood friend told Harwood.

The sisters never seemed interested in dating or expanding their social spheres. They listed each other as their next of kin, Harwood said.

“All they had was each other and that’s actually the way they wanted it,” he said.

Joyce Peterson of the International Twins Association, a social group based in Oklahoma, said she once heard of 100-year-old twins who died within days of each other.

“As a twin, you’ve got this bond, you’re close _ almost like a married couple,” said Peterson, of Minnesota, who serves as co-vice president of the group with her identical sister. “It’s a bond no one else can understand.”

The Miller twins appeared in poor health recently and possibly had been treated a year ago for dehydration or malnutrition, Harwood said.

Their childhood friend told Harwood that the sisters stopped sending annual birthday cards last year, and when the friend called to inquire about the missing card, the sisters seem disinterested in continuing the relationship.

Neighbors would call and the sisters would say, “Let me call you right back,” and then wouldn’t.

“They weren’t taking care of themselves as they should or could have,” Harwood said.