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About a third of the hosts are professional pet care providers while two-thirds are casual dog lovers who might be retired, unemployed, stay-at-home moms or veterans, Hirschhorn said. Nine out of 10 hosts have their own dogs.

Hirschhorn wouldn’t divulge the number of stays logged in the first two months, but said about half of all boarders are repeat customers.

DogVacay takes credit cards for payment when reservations are made, then pays the hosts.

Interviews and security checks by DogVacay and meet-and-greets with host and owner are designed to overcome concerns about adjusting to the new environment.

“If they don’t want to check me out, it means they don’t care about their dog very much,” said host Lauren Meyer.

Meyer has a 2,500 square-foot home in a quiet neighborhood in Los Angeles and charges $38 a night. She has always had older, larger dogs with medical problems, so she’s not afraid to keep dogs with special needs, she said.

The biggest problem for the Hirschhorns is keeping up with demand and updating the website with new features, he said.

DogVacay has a concierge, a customer service representative who can help if there is a problem or if someone can’t navigate the website.

Personal dog chef Danielle Rapin of Brooklyn, N.Y., has been hosting for three months for $40 a night. She has had four boarders so far, but has six meet-and-greets lined up in the next two weeks as people prepare for summer vacations.

DogVacay has been good for her 4-year-old mini-Greyhound mix too, she said. A 12-pound rescue, Baci once had to fend for herself on the streets, so didn’t have much time for socialization.

But she has turned into a remarkable hostess. “It’s been rewarding to see her develop,” Rapin said.

For the Hirschhorns, dogs may be just the beginning. They own the domain names for a variety of vacays, including pet, animal, cat, iguana, bird, hamster, rabbit and snake.

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Online:

_ http://dogvacay.com/