- - Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Lady Gaga is as confused as anyone about whether she’ll be allowed to perform in Indonesia.

Islamic hard-liners have threatened violence, saying her sexy clothes and provocative dance moves could corrupt youth. Police initially denied a permit for the Jakarta stop for Gaga’s “Born This Way Ball,” but now are hinting the concert could go ahead if the pop diva tones down the show.

She tweeted Tuesday:

“The Jakarta situation is 2-fold: Indonesian authorities demand I censor the show & religious extremist separately, are threatening violence. If the show does go on as scheduled, I will perform the BTWBall alone.”

What she meant wasn’t clear, and her promoters have not commented.

Indonesia, a predominantly Muslim nation of 240 million people, was supposed to be the biggest show on Lady Gaga’s Asian tour.

Johnny Depp adopted by Comanche tribe

Johnny Depp has been made an honorary member of the Comanche tribe.

Mr. Depp is in New Mexico, shooting the film adaptation of “The Lone Ranger.” He plays “Ranger” sidekick Tonto in the film.

Comanche Nation tribal member LaDonna Harris said Tuesday that the tribal chairman presented Mr. Depp with a proclamation at her Albuquerque home May 16. She said the Comanche adoption tradition means she now considers Mr. Depp her son.

Ms. Harris said Mr. Depp seemed humbled.

His spokeswoman, Jayne Ngo, confirmed the actor participated in a ceremony, but she declined to provide details.

Ms. Harris said she had read in interviews that Mr. Depp identified himself as being part Native American, so she thought it would be fun to adopt him — a tradition she said is common in Comanche culture. She ran the idea past her adult children, and they agreed.

Ms. Harris said she reached out to the “Dark Shadows” star through a friend who is working as a cultural adviser on the “Lone Ranger” set.

The Comanche Nation is based in Lawton, Okla. About half of its 15,000 members live in southwestern Oklahoma.

Mr. Depp has been the topic of much discussion in Indian Country and online since he was cast as Tonto, with comments ranging from his costume, to the selection of a non-Native for the part, to how the role itself historically has epitomized Hollywood’s misrepresentation of Native culture.

Actor McKean hit by cab in New York City

Actor Michael McKean, who portrayed the lead singer in the movie “This Is Spinal Tap,” was injured when he was hit by a car in New York City.

A spokeswoman for Mr. McKean, Harriet Sternberg, said the actor suffered a broken leg.

Emergency officials said Mr. McKean was struck at West 86th Street and Broadway in Manhattan just before 3 p.m. Tuesday. He was taken to St. Luke’s hospital where he was in stable condition. Police had no further details.

Mr. McKean also played Lenny on the hit television show “Laverne & Shirley.” He’s currently starring in the Broadway production of Gore Vidal’s political drama, “Best Man.”

‘Polka King’ Blazonczyk dies at age 70

Grammy Award-winning polka great Eddie Blazonczyk, who began playing the lively music in the 1950s and went on to earn the nickname “Polka King” after starting his own band and label, has died. He was 70.

His record label, Bel-Aire Recordings, and his son, Eddie Blazonczyk Jr., said Tuesday that Mr. Blazonczyk died of natural causes Monday at a hospital in the Chicago suburb of Palos Heights.

Mr. Blazonczyk retired in 2001 after suffering a stroke, and his son took over his band, Eddie Blazonczyk and the Versatones. The band formed in 1962, after Mr. Blazonczyk’s brief venture into pop music that landed him on Dick Clark’s “American Bandstand,” and toured the U.S., Canada and parts of Europe.

“He attracted so many people to the polka audience, whereas previously they were scared away by the word polka,” Eddie Blazonczyk Jr. said. “After hearing his style of the music, they weren’t afraid of polka anymore. They knew it wasn’t ‘She’s Too Fat For Me’ or ‘Roll Out the Barrel.’ They knew it was an evolution of the music.”

The Versatones, which picked up a Grammy in 1987, played their last show on Dec. 31, 2011.

The younger Blazonczyk described his father as a kind of music mogul, a founding member of the International Polka Association, a disc jockey and polka music promoter who ran a publishing company and music school.

“He was very good at what he did,” said Dave Ulczycki, president of the International Polka Association. “That’s why he was called the ‘Polka King.’ He was the top guy.”

Compiled from Web and wire reports