- The Washington Times - Wednesday, May 30, 2012

The family of President Dwight D. Eisenhower is welcoming design changes by architect Frank Gehry for a memorial honoring the World War II general, but says any monument should be simple, sustainable and affordable to honor his values.

In a statement Wednesday, the family says it continues to oppose the use of large metal scrims to frame a memorial park near the National Mall. Mr. Gehry has called them tapestries that would depict Eisenhower’s boyhood home in Kansas.

The family says the scope and scale of the images woven in metal remain “controversial and divisive.”

Mr. Gehry and his team proposed changes this month. He replaced images carved in stone with 9-foot-tall statues of Ike as World War II hero and as president.


Candidate legally changes name to Web address

TALLAHASSEE | Florida is letting a congressional candidate put the name of his Web address on the ballot.

Why? Because Eddie Gonzalez went before a Miami-Dade judge and had his name legally changed to “VoteforEddie.com.”

A Florida Department of State spokesman said Wednesday that state election officials have no choice but to let his legal name appear on the general election ballot. A judge granted the name-change request just days after election officials told him he could not use any nicknames.

VoteforEddie.com, who lists a Hialeah address, is an independent candidate running in the 25th Congressional District, which includes parts of Broward, Collier and Miami-Dade counties. He is challenging Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, a Republican.

Election records show that VoteforEddie.com already has gathered enough petition signatures to qualify for the ballot.


U.S. to impose stiff tariffs on China over clean energy

The Obama administration is moving to impose stiff new tariffs on wind-energy towers made in China, the latest strike in an escalating trade war over clean energy.

The Commerce Department said in a preliminary decision Wednesday that Chinese companies have received government subsidies on steel wind towers ranging from about 14 percent to 26 percent. The decision could result in tariffs of those amounts being imposed on about a dozen Chinese companies that export large numbers of steel wind towers to the United States.

It follows a Commerce Department decision this month to impose tariffs averaging about 31 percent on solar cells and panels imported from China.

China has called the U.S. action on solar equipment unfair and warned that higher tariffs could hurt efforts to promote clean energy.


Groups plan pre-convention protest of Democrats

CHARLOTTE | Charlotte has given permission to a coalition to hold a major protest the weekend before the Democratic National Convention.

The long-awaited permits are being issued after the Coalition to March on Wall Street South collected petitions with more than 1,000 names demanding that the North Carolina city approve the Sept. 2 protest. The petitions were handed to city leaders this week.

Coalition spokesman Ben Carroll said Wednesday that organizers have been pressuring the city since filing the permit paperwork eight months ago. The coalition plans to protest economic policies that it says hurt working families.

He called it a victory, but says the groups still want Charlotte to take other measures, including repealing a new ordinance that tightens security during so-called “extraordinary events.”

The convention is being held Sept. 4-6.

From wire dispatches and staff reports

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