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His efforts have drawn criticism from those who accuse him of instituting a “nanny state.”

“There they go again,” said Stefan Friedman, spokesman for the New York City Beverage Association, who called the latest proposal “zealous.”

“The New York City Health Department’s unhealthy obsession with attacking soft drinks is again pushing them over the top,” he said. “The city is not going to address the obesity issue by attacking soda because soda is not driving the obesity rates.”

The Bloomberg administration has tried other ways to discourage soda consumption. The mayor supported a state tax on sodas, but the measure died in Albany, and he tried to restrict the use of food stamps to buy sodas, an idea federal regulators rejected.

Mark Kalinowski, an analyst with Janney Capital Markets who covers companies including McDonald’s, said it is unlikely the ban will be enacted.

“Folks who want to buy Big Gulps and Frappucinos, a lot of those customers, you’re only going to be able to take it away from them by prying it out of their cold, dead hands,” he said.

And if it does go into effect, he said, customers will probably just respond by ordering two drinks.

“Maybe the mayor can outlaw all soft drinks and outlaw all fun while he’s at it,” Kalinowski scoffed.

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Follow Samantha Gross at www.twitter.com/samanthagross