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Upon replacing Kennedy in Paris, Gallagher told the supreme commander of Allied forces, future president Dwight D. Eisenhower, that “If I’d been Kennedy, I’d have done the same thing — except that I’d have telephoned you first,” according to an account by the late AP correspondent John Hightower.

After being fired by the AP, Kennedy took a job as managing editor of the Santa Barbara News-Press in California, and then went on to become publisher of the Monterey Peninsula Herald. He died at age 58 after being struck by an automobile.

Kennedy’s family had held on to the manuscript for decades before his daughter, Cochran, began looking for a publisher.

She said that even though she was only 16 when her father died, she got the impression he still took great joy in his career, despite the episode.

“Some people said after the war, ‘Oh, Ed Kennedy is a broken man. He’s out there editing some little newspaper in California.’ I think people had this idea that he was feeling sorry for himself. But he wasn’t. He wasn’t the kind of person who sat around and felt sorry.”

Curley said Kennedy’s daughter approached him around the same time he had become interested in the matter while helping with work on the book “Breaking News: How The Associated Press Has Covered War, Peace, and Everything Else.” The publication of Kennedy’s memoir prompted the AP’s apology, Curley said.

He called Kennedy’s dismissal “a great, great tragedy” and hailed him and the desk editors who put the surrender story on the wire for upholding the highest principles of journalism.

“They did the right thing,” Curley said. “They stood up to power.”