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NEW MEXICO

Hobbs picked as site of scientific ghost town

ALBUQUERQUE — Gov. Susana Martinez and a group of investors announced Tuesday that a city in the heart of southeastern New Mexico’s oil and gas country will be the site of a new $1 billion scientific ghost town where researchers will be able to test everything from renewable energy innovations to intelligent traffic systems and next-generation wireless networks.

Pegasus-Global Holdings and its New Mexico subsidiary, CITE Development, had narrowed the list of potential sites to two last month. Officials announced during Tuesday’s news conference that Hobbs beat out a location near Las Cruces.

Hobbs Mayor Sam Cobb said the unique research and development will be a key for diversifying the economy.

“It brings so many great opportunities and puts us on a world stage,” he said.

Not far from the Texas border, the community has been growing and local leaders have been pushing to expand the area’s reputation to include economic development ventures beyond the staple of oil and gas.

The city currently has two nonstop flights from Houston each day and is working on getting daily service to Albuquerque and Denver. Mr. Cobb said discussions for the new flights have just started but having the research center may bolster efforts to connect Hobbs to more cities.

MICHIGAN

Teen’s sweet prom dress made of candy wrappers

ISHPEMING — A northern Michigan teen put together one sweet prom dress, thanks to the help of classmates who collected thousands of Starburst wrappers for her.

Diane McNease tells WLUC-TV that she came up with the idea of making her prom dress out of candy wrappers when she saw a friend folding some. She estimates it took about 18,000 Starburst wrappers to make the corset of her dress, as well as matching hair bands and a purse.

The Ishpeming High School student wore the dress to Saturday’s prom in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

The top half of the dress is made out of folded wrappers and the bottom looks more like a traditional gown. It took about five months to make, with help from family and friends.

CALIFORNIA

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