- Associated Press - Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Major League Baseball would fund scholarships and exert greater influence over Division I college baseball under what would be an unprecedented partnership with the NCAA.

If an agreement is reached, it would be the first of its kind and could lead other professional organizations enter partnerships with the NCAA.

The NCAA’s point man in the talks, University of Hartford President Walter Harrison, said it could take a year or longer for an agreement to be reached because new or amended legislation might be required.

“There is a lot for us to explore as an association,” Harrison said. “The one principle we have is that we want to be completely true to the core values of amateur collegiate baseball… I want to be cautious about whether this will happen or not. These are concepts at the moment.”

Still, Harrison said he could see similar arrangements occurring in other sports that generally produce no revenue for colleges. The PGA, for example, might one day help fund scholarships in golf, he said.

According to Harrison, five issues have been discussed with MLB: scholarships, ways to increase diversity, the calendar for the entry draft and College World Series, MLB’s involvement in summer leagues, and wooden bats. The discussions were first reported by CBSSports.com.

Oregon State coach Pat Casey told The Associated Press on Tuesday he sees only positives if MLB increases its involvement. North Carolina coach Mike Fox said he’s wary of becoming beholden to MLB.

“Usually when you provide money to someone,” Fox said, “you want something in return.”

MLB spokesman Pat Courtney said it was too early to comment on the discussions. Union head Michael Weiner characterized the talks as “exploratory.”

“It’s been our view for a long time that while each player gets to make his own decision, we’d like to encourage as many players as possible to use their athletic ability to try to get an education before they try a professional career,” Weiner said.

Harrison said the most dramatic proposal would have MLB fund one full scholarship for each Division I program that meets certain criteria. A possibility, he said, is that a program would have to already provide a full allotment of 11.7 scholarships to be eligible for the extra one. MLB stipulated that the scholarship could be awarded to only one player, rather than splitting them.

Harrison said the reason for awarding a full scholarship is that it would potentially attract economically disadvantaged minorities who otherwise might quit playing baseball in hopes of earning a full scholarship in basketball or football. MLB has been particularly concerned about the decrease in number of African-American players in the big leagues.

Black players made up 5 percent of Division I baseball players last season, according to the NCAA. The percentage of blacks in the major leagues was 8.8 percent on opening day this year, according to the University of Central Florida’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.

“There are a lot less African-American kids playing at the high school level than there should be, and whatever can be done to help that situation and facilitate opportunities is good,” Oregon State’s Casey said.

Harrison said the proposal would give MLB no say in who receives the scholarship. Fox said he wondered if MLB would require the awards be given to black student-athletes, and he had other concerns.

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