Where the wild things still are: bedtime rituals

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Chris McLeod is all grown up at 28 and living in Quincy, Mass., away from his mom, Joan Gaylord in Bedford, N.Y. His memories of “Wild Things,” a childhood favorite, are muted now, though his mother hasn’t forgotten her years of reading it aloud.

“At this point, I remember only one line: `We’ll eat you up _ we love you so!’ The funny thing is that, in my mind, the wild things aren’t saying it. My mom is,” McLeod said. “I vividly recall my mom reading that line aloud, adopting her best husky monster howl.”

David Caughran, 45, has a 7-year-old son who has sadly already moved on from Sendak, a writer dad has never forgotten.

“My favorite growing up was `In the Night Kitchen,’” said Caughran, in Vancouver, British Columbia. “I can still recite lines.”

He fears that Sendak, a lush illustrator, might already be lost like other picture book creators to children reading e-books exclusively. “I truly hope that real books don’t get supplanted,” for when it comes to writers like Sendak, “There’s something about the experience of holding and reading a true paper book.”

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