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Jordan said once the Bobcats establish that culture more big-name free agents will want to come to Charlotte.

“Last year we went through the process of stripping down the organization and trying to build that back up,” Jordan said. “And this is another step toward that. Getting a young coach who understands our vision about what type of team we want to be and then being able to go pluck some of these (free agents) to mesh with what we have.”

The Bobcats added some veteran leadership to a young team this offseason, claiming center Brendan Haywood off waivers, trading for guard Ben Gordon and signing free agent Ramon Sessions from the Los Angeles Lakers.

While all three are proven commodities and bring various skills, none are considered franchise players _ certainly not the way Jordan was with the Bulls.

Jordan would love to have a marquee player.

And if that player does comes available in free agency or via trade _ and if he wants to play in Charlotte _ Jordan said he’s willing to go to great lengths to get him.

“I’ll spend money, that that’s not even a question, if a person fits what we want to do and it makes sense,” Jordan said. “But I don’t think it makes sense for us to be in a luxury tax situation and fighting for the eighth spot in the playoffs. That doesn’t make any sense. You have to spend money wisely.”

Jordan won’t say when he expects the Bobcats to make the playoffs or even how many wins it would take for him to consider this a successful season.

He only told Dunlap he expects the team should be much better on Feb. 1 than they are Friday night when they open the season against the Indiana Pacers.

“Our (long-term) success is predicated on a lot of things, especially this year,” Jordan said. “First, how will the (young players) adapt to the process we’re going through. We’ll know what holes we have to plug at the end of the year because we have some key contracts coming up” with Gerald Henderson and Byron Mullens becoming free agents.

“We will start to plug some of that,” Jordan said. “But it’s hard for me to make that suggestion of two or three years we’re going to be in the playoffs. I hope we are.”

The Bobcats should have significant salary cap space next year, and Jordan hopes the new CBA will prevent players to jumping to what he calls “mega-teams” and create more parity throughout the league.

Any way you look at it, Jordan and the Bobcats have a long road to hoe.

But Jordan wants to see it through.

“I don’t anticipate getting out of this business,” Jordan said. “My competitive nature is I want to succeed. It’s always been said that when I can’t find a way to do anything, I will find a way to do it.

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