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Prosecutor dismisses cops’ shooting explanation

MEXICO CITY — Mexican federal police who ambushed a U.S. Embassy vehicle, wounding two CIA officers, were not investigating a kidnapping in the area, the attorney general’s office said Sunday, contradicting the official police explanation of the shooting.

The CIA officers were heading down a dirt road to a military installation south of Mexico City on Aug. 24 with a Mexican navy captain when a carload of gunmen opened fire on their SUV with diplomatic plates and gave chase. More vehicles joined in the pursuit, and the armored SUV was riddled with bullets.

The two CIA officers, who have not been identified, received injuries that were not life-threatening. The captain was not hurt.

Mexican federal police maintain it was a case of mistaken identity since the officers were investigating a kidnapping of a government official in the area. Police suggested the officers might not have noticed the vehicle’s diplomatic plates and thought they were shooting at criminals.

HONDURAS

Top parties choose presidential candidates

TEGUCIGALPA — Three Honduran political parties chose their candidates for next year’s general elections in primary voting Sunday that heralded the return of ousted former President Manuel Zelaya to politics in his Central American country.

Mr. Zelaya’s wife, Xiomara Castro, is running uncontested as the presidential candidate in 2013 for the leftist Liberty and Refoundation party, or Libre, while the ousted president is seeking to be a congressional candidate.

The National and Liberal parties, which have long dominated Honduran politics, fielded multiple candidates.

Late Sunday, Honduras’ Supreme Electoral Tribunal said preliminary results showed Mauricio Villeda ahead as presidential candidate for the Liberal Party, while the National Party was favoring Juan Orlando Hernandez.

It was unclear when the official final results would be announced.

A mission of 40 Organization of American States observers said the voting process had been “normal.”

From wire dispatches and staff reports