- Associated Press - Monday, November 26, 2012

BOULDER, COLO. (AP) - A choked-up Jon Embree suggested Monday that the only way he could have turned around the University of Colorado’s flailing football program in his two years as head coach was to take shortcuts in the classroom and on the recruiting trail.

“If you just hire the next guy and say you’ve got two years, keep your fingers crossed,” Embree said at his farewell news conference a day after being fired.

Athletic director Mike Bohn, who fired Embree less than two years after he signed him to a five-year deal, said, “Shortcuts are not going to be an answer and we’re not going to hire a coach that expects to use shortcuts.”

What he does expect is a quick turnaround from a free-fall that saw the Buffaloes thumped by an average score of 48-17 in the Pac-12 during a 1-11 season that was the worst in the program’s 123-year history.

In some ways, Embree’s quick hook might have had a lot to do with the administration patiently sticking with his predecessor, Dan Hawkins, through five losing seasons, resulting in the proverbial bare cupboard.

Bohn bristled at that notion.

Jon’s results were extremely revealing in a very short period of time, and the prowess of the Pac-12 conference revealed it a lot faster,” Bohn said.

Embree, who gets a $1.625 million buyout, suggested he got a raw deal, pointing out he only got 1 1/2 recruiting classes to turn around a program that had been down on its luck for several years.

Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano said he appreciated Embree’s passion for the program but said it just wasn’t working out.

“It’s performance and progress. And unfortunately, this year, we didn’t see either,” he said.

Bohn pointed to a program that was headed in the wrong direction both on and off the field, going 4-21 under Embree, with so many blowouts leading to too many empty seats, though he insisted boosters had nothing to do with this decision.

“Our boosters’ resources have never been a factor in my tenure,” Bohn said. “Although the erosion of our fan base and the ticket sales certainly doesn’t help.”

Bohn said he had no preferred candidate in mind but acknowledged the school would have to pay more than Embree’s incentive-laden deal that was worth $741,000 annually plus bonuses of up to $200,000 for reaching off-the-field goals and up to $1 million for meeting on-the-field benchmarks.

Bohn said he was still forming a search committee but wanted to make a hire as soon as possible.

Embree, a star tight end for the Buffs in the 1980s, was fired Sunday night, 48 hours after a 42-35 loss to Utah left them without a home win for the first time since 1920.

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