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Homeless shelters push into tony areas of NYC

- Associated Press - Wednesday, October 10, 2012

NEW YORK — With a grand entryway of ornate white stonework, the elegant building seems to blend right into this Manhattan neighborhood of multimillion-dollar brownstones. It's the crowd of people who loiter on the stoop at all hours – under the constant eye of a surveillance camera – that gives it away as a homeless shelter.

Faced with unprecedented overcrowding in New York City's homeless shelters, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has cut through the bureaucracy to open up new shelters across the city, pushing some into wealthy areas where residents fear their new neighbors will bring crime and drugs.

"It sort of felt almost like a bomb landing," said Gwynne Rivers, a mother of three who lives near a new shelter for homeless adults on the city's Upper West Side. "We just have lots of concerns about safety. And no one really seemed to care about what we thought."

Mr. Bloomberg has opened 10 new homeless shelters in recent months in response to the escalating crisis. At last count, more than 46,000 people sought shelter every night in New York, the highest number ever recorded. A recent census report found the city harbors a disproportionate 14 percent of the nation's homeless, with Los Angeles a distant second at 3 percent.

The crisis stems from a lack of affordable housing and the city's ever-widening gap between the rich and the poor, one of the widest in the U.S. and comparable to that found in sub-Saharan Africa.

Unlike in other cities, New York is required by law to provide shelter to every person who seeks it. As the crisis escalates, the city has used its power of emergency authority to create shelters as quickly as possible, bypassing the typical community approval process. And that has created turmoil in neighborhoods like the Upper West Side, where a shelter opened in August among apartments occupied by the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans.

Further complicating matters is the fact that the shelter is right across the street from P.S. 75, an elementary school which also has a playground.

"There definitely seem to be more people hanging around the street corners, at the subway stops, panhandling," said Jen Zunt, a mother of a fifth-grader at P.S. 75. "There's not enough supervision. And these are going to be people who have mental health issues, possibly."

Anxious parents say they've seen homeless men urinating in doorways and loitering near the school. Many mothers have stopped letting their children walk home alone. The parent-teacher association is working with local police to increase security on the street, which is a pedestrian corridor to Riverside Park's soccer fields and playgrounds.

"We all have kids walking to the park to play soccer," Ms. Zunt said. "I have a 14-year-old daughter who goes on her own to school and goes to chorus. And, you know, that's really scary."

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