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“The Fundamental Law was born in the middle of the most severe economic crisis in decades. Runaway government debt and looming deficits were crippling the nations on both sides of the Atlantic,” he said. “I consider this constitutional novelty to be a child of the crisis but also the hope of our children’s future.”

Judge Stumpf noted that he developed a respect for America’s founding documents when he was studying in the U.S. in the 1980s.

“There is much talk [today] about a post-American era and American decline,” he said. “I can tell you that the ideals of the Founding Fathers, the principles of the U.S. Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence were not and are not in decline.

“On the contrary. Democracies around the world, old and new, need them now more than ever.”

Call Embassy Row at 202/636-3297 or email jmorrison@washingtontimes.com. The column is published on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.