- The Washington Times - Thursday, October 11, 2012

In an instant, T.C. Maslin’s life was profoundly changed forever (“Three arrested in brutal August beating of man near Eastern Market,” Web, Sept. 27). He became a victim of crime while innocently walking down the street after leaving a restaurant. Brutally beaten by three young thugs, Mr. Maslin now has severe and profound life-altering injuries that will leave an indelible mark on him and his family.

Robbery appeared to be the motive, and Mr. Maslin was apparently willing to give up his property, realizing that something was awry when he was approached by three men. The men could have just taken his property and let him be. Instead, they chose to violently attack him to the point at which he suffered severe head trauma and was left on the street, unconsciousness only to be discovered the next day in that condition.

The horrific impact of this vicious attack reverberates in the community with the recognition that it could have been any innocent person walking down the street at that time. Mr. Maslin, however, was the one who became the victim. Only 29 years old, married and the father of a young child, Mr. Maslin now spends his days in the continuous process of trying to rehabilitate to any extent possible. He did not ask for this, nor did he deserve it.

These violent offenders need to be held accountable to the fullest extent of the law without proffering excuses, justifications or explanations for their violent behavior. They were old enough to know better and to understand that it is wrong to rob someone of his property. To viciously attack an innocent person and leave him in this state is not only criminal, but unconscionable.

KAREN L. BUNE

Adjunct professor

Department of Justice, Law and Society

George Mason University

Fairfax