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While the arguments about Armstrong will continue among sports fans — and there is still a question of whether USADA or the UCI has the ultimate authority to take away his Tour titles — the new report puts a cap on a long round of official investigations. Armstrong was cleared of criminal charges in February after a federal grand jury probe that lasted about two years.

USADA sought evidence from federal investigators, but in its report, the agency said none was ever turned over to its offices, based in Colorado Springs, Colo.

UCI confirmed receiving the report and said it would respond to it soon, “not to delay matters any longer than necessary.” It has 21 days to appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport.

The head of the Lance Armstrong Foundation, Doug Ulman, lauded Armstrong’s work as a cancer fighter. Armstrong won all his titles after overcoming testicular cancer.

“Our longstanding concerns about the impartiality and fairness of USADA’s proceeding are compounded today,” Ulman said. “As a federal judge pointed out, USADA appears motivated more by publicity rather than fulfilling its mission.”

Some of the newest information — never spelled out in detail before Wednesday — includes a depiction of Armstrong’s continuing relationship with physician and training guru Michele Ferrari. Like Armstrong, Ferrari has received a lifetime ban from USADA.

Long thought of as the mastermind of Armstrong’s alleged doping plan, Ferrari was investigated in Italy and Armstrong claimed he had cut ties with the doctor after a 2004 conviction that was later overturned. USADA cites financial records that show payments of at least $210,000 in the two years after that. It also cited emails from 2009 showing Armstrong asking Ferrari’s son if he could make a $25,000 cash payment the next time they saw each other.

“The repeated efforts by Armstrong and his representatives to mischaracterize and minimize Armstrong’s relationship with Ferrari are indicative of the true nature of that relationship,” the report states. “If there is not something to hide, there is no need to hide it and certainly no need to repeatedly lie about it.”

The report also went to the World Anti-Doping Agency, which also has the right to appeal, but so far has supported USADA’s position in the Armstrong case.

“We would like to commend USADA for having the courage and the resolve to keep focused in working on this difficult case for the sake of clean athletes and the integrity of sport,” WADA President John Fahey said.

ASO, the company that runs the Tour de France and could have a say in where Armstrong’s titles eventually go, said it has “no particular comment to make on this subject.”

Armstrong chose not to pursue the case and instead accepted the sanction, though he has consistently argued that the USADA system was rigged against him, calling the agency’s effort a “witch hunt” that used special rules it doesn’t follow in all its other cases.

His attorney, Herman, was even more pointed in his criticism. He called it “a one-sided hatchet job — a taxpayer funded tabloid piece rehashing old, disproved, unreliable allegations based largely on axe-grinders, serial perjurers, coerced testimony, sweetheart deals and threat-induced stories.”

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AP Sports Writers John Leicester in Paris, Steven Wilson in London, Graham Dunbar in Geneva, Jim Vertuno in Austin, Texas and Dave Skretta in Kansas City, Mo., contributed to this report.

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