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But resident Leonid Temkin had mixed feelings about publicizing the names because it could cause marriages to dissolve and men to lose their jobs.

“I think it’ll cause a lot of hardship,” he said.

The prostitution charges and ensuing publicity, which reached across the country and beyond, came as a shock in the small town of about 10,000 residents, which is well-known for its ocean beaches, old sea captains’ mansions and the neighboring town of Kennebunkport, home to the Bush family’s Walker’s Point summer compound.

Some people in town said they had their suspicions about Wright, but others were in the dark about the life of the bubbly dance instructor who introduced many local women to the Latin-flavored dance and fitness program.

Ackley’s daughter, Alison Ackley, who participated in Wright’s class four or five times, said she had no inkling of any illegal activity.

“She was so young,” Alison Ackley said. “She had a lot going for her. It’s a shame she was hanging out with these older men and getting money from them.”

But Kim Ackley said she believes the interest will die down once all the names become public in the coming weeks.

“A year from now it won’t even be talked about, once it goes through the courts,” she said. “You’ve got to move on and go on with your lives.”

Associated Press reporter David Sharp in Portland contributed to this report.