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In a few weeks, Moses is expected to start eating hay, grass, bark and horse feed along with his formula. He has started putting grass and leaves in his mouth but he is not yet eating them. By the time he is four he will stop having formula and will be eating vegetation. And when he is five, Webb plans to reintroduce Moses to life in the wild, possibly in the national park where he was found.

In the meantime Webb plans to raise funds to build a boma, an African-style corral, where Moses can live when he becomes too big for the house.

“By the time he is two years old, he will no longer be able to fit through the door and he will have to live outside,” said Webb.

Webb wants to make Moses “an ambassador for elephants” to educate people against wildlife poaching.

Raising Moses has been challenging, said Webb, “but it has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. I have raised children, and this is very similar, but you can’t put an elephant in a pram (stroller).”

Webb said that raising Moses gave her the idea to start an orphanage for other animals.

“When we got Moses we found there is a desperate need for an orphanage for large animals. Elephants, hippos, buffalo, rhinos … there is no place for those babies to go if their parents are killed,” she said. “There are some places in Zambia and Kenya, but no place here in Malawi, so that is what I am working for.”