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In an interview, Snipes said he sealed the affidavit at the request of law enforcement officials who cited the sensitivity of the case and the fact that they believed evidence could be destroyed if the document was made public.

“They convinced me,” Snipes said. “I wouldn’t have done it otherwise.”

Watson, a native of the small North Texas community of Copeville, was a key figure in the Tate-La Bianca murders, one of the most notorious crimes of the 20th century. He, Manson and three others were sentenced to death, but the sentences were commuted to life in prison when the death penalty was briefly outlawed in California in 1972.

Watson was portrayed in trial testimony as Manson’s lieutenant, a cruel killer who stabbed Tate, the pregnant wife of film director Roman Polanski, as she begged for her baby’s life.

Boyd fought to prevent Watson’s extradition from Texas. After Watson was returned to California, he was ruled insane and committed to a mental institution before it was determined he was fit to stand trial.

According to Payne’s testimony in bankruptcy court, Boyd sold copies of the tapes to the co-author of Watson’s book for $49,000 to cover his legal fees after the killer waived his right to attorney-client privilege. Given those circumstances, the tapes should be made available to the LAPD, she testified.

But Watson, now 66, has argued in court documents that he waived his attorney-client privilege only for the book. He has stated that he’s willing to allow the LAPD to listen to the tapes but not take possession of them because he’s concerned that the media would gain access as well.

“In the eyes of justice, I am fully willing for the LAPD to listen to the tapes to satisfy their investigation, but not to take possession, since they are not their property,” he wrote in a motion filed in June.