- Associated Press - Thursday, October 25, 2012

VISOKO, Bosnia-Herzegovina — When Amra Babic walks down the streets of the central Bosnian town of Visoko wearing her Muslim headscarf, men sitting in outdoor cafes instantly rise from their chairs, fix their clothes and put out their cigarettes.

The respect is only natural: Mrs. Babic is their new mayor.

The 43-year-old economist has blazed a trail in this war-scarred Balkan nation by becoming its first hijab-wearing mayor, and possibly the only one in Europe.

Her victory comes as governments elsewhere in Europe debate laws to ban the Muslim veil, and Turkey, another predominantly Islamic country seeking EU membership, maintains a strict policy of keeping religious symbols out of public life.


For Mrs. Babic, the electoral triumph is proof that observance of Muslim tradition is compatible with Western democratic values.

“It’s a victory of tolerance,” the wartime widow said. “We have sent a message out from Visoko. A message of tolerance, democracy and equality.”

She sees no contradiction in the influences that define her life.

“I am the East, and I am the West,” she said. “I am proud to be a Muslim and to be a European. I come from a country where religions and cultures live next to each other. All that together is my identity.”

For centuries, Bosnia has been a cultural and religious mix of Muslim Bosniaks, Christian Orthodox Serbs and Roman Catholic Croats who occasionally fought each but most of the time lived peacefully together.

Then came the Balkans wars of the 1990s in which ethnic hatreds bottled up by Yugoslavia’s communist regime exploded as the federation disintegrated.

Bosnia’s Muslim majority fell victim to the genocidal rampage of ethnic Serbs seeking to form a breakaway state.

As an economist and local politician, Mrs. Babic has played an active role in Bosnia’s emergence from the ashes. She was a bank auditor and served as the regional finance minister before running for mayor.

Now Mrs. Babic feels she is ready to run this town of 45,000 people, mostly Bosnian Muslims, for the next four years.

She wants to fix the infrastructure, partly ruined by the Bosnian 1992-95 war and partly by postwar poverty.

And she plans to make Visoko attractive for investment, encouraging youth to start small businesses. It’s all part of her strategy to fight the town’s unemployment rate of more than 25 percent.

Story Continues →