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McDonnell: ‘It’s still a very dangerous weather situation’

  • Rising water from the Hudson River overtakes a bank drive-through in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy lashed the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Rising water from the Hudson River overtakes a bank drive-through in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy lashed the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • People wade and paddle down a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)People wade and paddle down a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  • Richard Thomas walks through the floodwaters in front of his home after assisting neighbors as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Forecasters warned that the New York City region could face the worst of Sandy as it bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of financial markets and mass transit, sending coastal residents fleeing and threatening high winds, rain and a wall of water up to 11 feet high. It could endanger up to 50 million people for days. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Richard Thomas walks through the floodwaters in front of his home after assisting neighbors as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Forecasters warned that the New York City region could face the worst of Sandy as it bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of financial markets and mass transit, sending coastal residents fleeing and threatening high winds, rain and a wall of water up to 11 feet high. It could endanger up to 50 million people for days. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the beach and across Beach Avenue on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the beach and across Beach Avenue on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Matison Cos, 3, tries to stay warm and dry along the boardwalk as her family comes to see the approaching Hurricane Sandy in Rehoboth Beach, Del., on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. (AP Photo/The News Journal, Suchat Pederson)Matison Cos, 3, tries to stay warm and dry along the boardwalk as her family comes to see the approaching Hurricane Sandy in Rehoboth Beach, Del., on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012. (AP Photo/The News Journal, Suchat Pederson)
  • In this July 7, 2010, photo, the tall ship HMS Bounty sails on Lake Erie off Cleveland. The U.S. Coast Guard has rescued 14 members of the crew forced to abandon the ship, which was caught in Hurricane Sandy off North Carolina. The Coast Guard is searching for two other crew members. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)In this July 7, 2010, photo, the tall ship HMS Bounty sails on Lake Erie off Cleveland. The U.S. Coast Guard has rescued 14 members of the crew forced to abandon the ship, which was caught in Hurricane Sandy off North Carolina. The Coast Guard is searching for two other crew members. (AP Photo/Mark Duncan, File)
  • Lifelong Cape May resident Andy Becica watches rough surf pound the beach on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Mr. Becica said this was the worst he's seen the ocean. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Lifelong Cape May resident Andy Becica watches rough surf pound the beach on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Mr. Becica said this was the worst he's seen the ocean. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • A woman carries bags back to her car after visiting a grocery store that is open for business despite being boarded up in advance of superstorm Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Sayville, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)A woman carries bags back to her car after visiting a grocery store that is open for business despite being boarded up in advance of superstorm Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Sayville, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Police and firefighters respond to a downed street light on FDR Drive on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)Police and firefighters respond to a downed street light on FDR Drive on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Waves crash over the bow of a tugboat as it passes near the Statue of Liberty in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as rough water as the result of Hurricane Sandy churned the waters of New York Harbor. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Waves crash over the bow of a tugboat as it passes near the Statue of Liberty in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as rough water as the result of Hurricane Sandy churned the waters of New York Harbor. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Alix Brignol of New York takes a picture as water washes over the seawall near high tide at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast.Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Alix Brignol of New York takes a picture as water washes over the seawall near high tide at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast.Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Waves wash over the seawall near high tide at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Waves wash over the seawall near high tide at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • The No. 1 subway train station is blocked by sandbags at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in preparation for a possible storm surge as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)The No. 1 subway train station is blocked by sandbags at Battery Park in New York on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in preparation for a possible storm surge as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Brandon White of Watermark, a tour and charter boat company, ties one of the company's boats to a pier in Annapolis as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)Brandon White of Watermark, a tour and charter boat company, ties one of the company's boats to a pier in Annapolis as Hurricane Sandy approaches the East Coast on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the beach and across Beach Avenue on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the beach and across Beach Avenue on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the dunes on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Rough surf of the Atlantic Ocean breaks over the dunes on Monday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., as high tide and Hurricane Sandy begin to arrive. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Richard Thomas moves a neighbor's car out of the rising water as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Forecasters warned that the New York City region could face the worst of Hurricane Sandy, forcing the shutdown of financial markets and mass transit; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening high winds, rain and a wall of water up to 11 feet high. The storm could endanger up to 50 million people for days. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Richard Thomas moves a neighbor's car out of the rising water as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Fenwick Island, Del. Forecasters warned that the New York City region could face the worst of Hurricane Sandy, forcing the shutdown of financial markets and mass transit; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening high winds, rain and a wall of water up to 11 feet high. The storm could endanger up to 50 million people for days. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • A stranded car sits along a street near downtown Norfolk, Va., on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)A stranded car sits along a street near downtown Norfolk, Va., on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • Jack Devnew and his dog check on his boat at a marina near downtown Norfolk, Va., on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)Jack Devnew and his dog check on his boat at a marina near downtown Norfolk, Va., on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • A Norfolk, Va., resident walks to work through floodwaters near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)A Norfolk, Va., resident walks to work through floodwaters near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • Norfolk, Va., resident Jack Devnew looks at the water covering a dock as he checks on his boat at a marina near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)Norfolk, Va., resident Jack Devnew looks at the water covering a dock as he checks on his boat at a marina near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • A lone man wearing a rain poncho walks past the White House in Washington on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, during the approach of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)A lone man wearing a rain poncho walks past the White House in Washington on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, during the approach of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
  • A pedestrian walks her dog through a working crew as they stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of massive flooding on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)A pedestrian walks her dog through a working crew as they stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of massive flooding on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Workers stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of flooding on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)Workers stack sandbags beside concrete barriers to protect buildings near the World Financial Center in anticipation of flooding on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy bore down on the Eastern Seaboard's largest cities Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds, soaking rain and a seawater surge of anywhere from 6 to 11 feet. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • A Norfolk, Va., resident chains his bike and heads to work in floodwaters near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)A Norfolk, Va., resident chains his bike and heads to work in floodwaters near downtown on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy were hitting the area. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders,on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. A blizzard led to a late start and an early close on Jan. 8, 1996, according to the exchange's parent company, NYSE Euronext. The NYSE also shut down on Sept. 27, 1985, for Hurricane Gloria. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders,on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. A blizzard led to a late start and an early close on Jan. 8, 1996, according to the exchange's parent company, NYSE Euronext. The NYSE also shut down on Sept. 27, 1985, for Hurricane Gloria. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  • Vanessa Pumo walks her dog, Bella, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy arrive on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Behind her is the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn Bridge (right). (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)Vanessa Pumo walks her dog, Bella, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy arrive on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Behind her is the Manhattan skyline and the Brooklyn Bridge (right). (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • Sandbags protect an entrance of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. There had been plans to allow electronic trading to go forward on the NYSE, but with a storm surge expected to cover parts of lower Manhattan in floodwaters, officials decided late Sunday that it was too risky to ask any personnel to staff the exchanges. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)Sandbags protect an entrance of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets; sending coastal residents fleeing; and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. There had been plans to allow electronic trading to go forward on the NYSE, but with a storm surge expected to cover parts of lower Manhattan in floodwaters, officials decided late Sunday that it was too risky to ask any personnel to staff the exchanges. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  • High winds blow sea foam onto Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)High winds blow sea foam onto Jeanette's Pier in Nags Head, N.C., on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, as wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy move into the area. Governors from North Carolina, where steady rains were whipped by gusting winds Saturday night, to Connecticut declared states of emergency. Delaware ordered mandatory evacuations for coastal communities by 8 p.m. Sunday. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
  • Sandbags line the entrance of a building as people walk by near the Hudson River waterfront on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Sandbags line the entrance of a building as people walk by near the Hudson River waterfront on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas Sunday as big cities and small towns across the Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • Ambulances line up near the Hoboken University Medical Center, where patients were evacuated in anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas as big cities and small towns across the Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Ambulances line up near the Hoboken University Medical Center, where patients were evacuated in anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012, in Hoboken, N.J. Tens of thousands of people were ordered to evacuate coastal areas as big cities and small towns across the Northeast braced for the onslaught of a superstorm threatening some 60 million people along the most heavily populated corridor in the nation. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
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Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell told residents Monday afternoon that the worst was still to come from Hurricane Sandy — especially in Northern Virginia, where Sandy's effects are supposed to grow stronger by Tuesday morning.

"We're concerned about Northern Virginia, where the wind gusts could be ... 70 miles per hour or more," Mr. McDonnell said at a news conference. "It's still a very dangerous weather situation around the entire state."

While power outages have been limited — Dominion Virginia reported just under 10,000 outages as of Tuesday afternoon, down from a peak of about 57,000 — Mr. McDonnell said the situation was likely to change.

"We'd be shocked if those numbers don't go up dramatically, especially in Northern Virginia," he said.

He also said he plans to petition the federal government for public assistance and for an expedited emergency declaration. The state has already declared its own state of emergency.

Mr. McDonnell also encouraged Virginians to donate to the Virginia Disaster Relief Fund to help their fellow residents.

"After the storm passes and skies clear, the work will not be over. Far from it," Mr. McDonnell said. "Virginians in every region are going to be recovering from significant damage. Virginians are going to need help."

In Old Town Alexandria, most residents heeded the warning to stay inside, but some braved the whipping in rain in high boots and umbrellas to explore the riverside, run errands, and even go for a late-morning jog. By 10 a.m., Alexandria police officers were posting wooden barriers warning not to cross and area where standing water was beginning to pool a block up from the Potomac River.

Many sidewalks were covered in leaves blown down by the steady wind gusting down the cobblestone streets. Townhomes at the Harborside community had their garages taped shut, covered with plastic tarps and weighted down by sandbags to stop the flow of rising water.

At the Christmas Attic along Union Street in Old Town — one block up from the river — co-owner Cheri Hennessy was beginning to clear the store's bottom floor for inevitable flooding.

The Fairfax resident said that while she doesn't have to worry too much about flooding, the store is in a perfect spot where rising river water meets the overflow from street drains and gutters.

"We had four feet of water from [Hurricane] Isabel," Ms. Hennessy said. "Hopefully I'm over-reacting, but we'll clear everything out of the front of the store and depending on what happens, work on the back inventory of the store."

• Meredith Somers contributed to this report.

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