O’Malley: ‘We’re only just now beginning the rough part of this storm’

  • Police officers from Arlington County help remove a downed tree from an exit ramp off of state route 50, in Arlington, VA., Monday, October 29, 2012. Winds from hurricane Sandy removed the tree from his stationary position and toppled it over onto the road, blocking traffic. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)Police officers from Arlington County help remove a downed tree from an exit ramp off of state route 50, in Arlington, VA., Monday, October 29, 2012. Winds from hurricane Sandy removed the tree from his stationary position and toppled it over onto the road, blocking traffic. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)
  • Police officers from Arlington County help remove a downed tree from an exit ramp off of state route 50, in Arlington, VA., Monday, October 29, 2012. Winds from hurricane Sandy removed the tree from his stationary position and toppled it over onto the road, blocking traffic. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)Police officers from Arlington County help remove a downed tree from an exit ramp off of state route 50, in Arlington, VA., Monday, October 29, 2012. Winds from hurricane Sandy removed the tree from his stationary position and toppled it over onto the road, blocking traffic. (Andrew S. Geraci/The Washington Times)
  • Kevin Dorsey, who has lived in his Huntington, Va. home for 13 years, has his basement furniture up on cinder blocks and says he realizes it still might float off of them. He has taken precautions to try to prevent water from coming into his basement, including boarding up the windows and sealing them with silicone and rubber tape, but he says it will likely still seep through. His neighbor has a generator that he can tie into, so he might stay at home if his local relatives lose power too. This image was made Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Kevin Dorsey, who has lived in his Huntington, Va. home for 13 years, has his basement furniture up on cinder blocks and says he realizes it still might float off of them. He has taken precautions to try to prevent water from coming into his basement, including boarding up the windows and sealing them with silicone and rubber tape, but he says it will likely still seep through. His neighbor has a generator that he can tie into, so he might stay at home if his local relatives lose power too. This image was made Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Dominion Power workers Brandon Zaluksi [cq], left, and Brian Moore use extend-o sticks to remove a tree branch from a communications wire in the backyard of a Huntington, Va. resident on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. They said that calls to Dominion Power are already coming at a steady rate, hours before Hurricane Sandy is expected to make landfall. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Dominion Power workers Brandon Zaluksi [cq], left, and Brian Moore use extend-o sticks to remove a tree branch from a communications wire in the backyard of a Huntington, Va. resident on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. They said that calls to Dominion Power are already coming at a steady rate, hours before Hurricane Sandy is expected to make landfall. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • A car hydroplanes in standing water northbound on the George Washington Memorial Parkway neat Gravelly Point in Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)A car hydroplanes in standing water northbound on the George Washington Memorial Parkway neat Gravelly Point in Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • Jeff Sciscilo, of Alexandria, Va., takes time for a cigarette while visiting O'Connell's Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)Jeff Sciscilo, of Alexandria, Va., takes time for a cigarette while visiting O'Connell's Restaurant in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • A man fights the heavy rain and initial winds from Hurricane Sandy at the marina in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)A man fights the heavy rain and initial winds from Hurricane Sandy at the marina in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • David Brooks clears leaves from a gutter along a section of Rhode Island Avenue that has been prone to flooding from big storms in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)David Brooks clears leaves from a gutter along a section of Rhode Island Avenue that has been prone to flooding from big storms in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Left to right: Chris Keller, Katie Hooks, and Christopher Graham brave the wind and rain to have a cigarette outside of Boundary Stone, a bar along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Left to right: Chris Keller, Katie Hooks, and Christopher Graham brave the wind and rain to have a cigarette outside of Boundary Stone, a bar along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Luis Saucedo who has recently moved to Washington, D.C. walked a few blocks over to Boundary Stone to have a beer before everything shut down along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Luis Saucedo who has recently moved to Washington, D.C. walked a few blocks over to Boundary Stone to have a beer before everything shut down along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Clyde Forbes walks into the front of his house past a halloween pumkin and maniquen with a sign that reads "Die Sandy Die!" along a section of Rhode Island Avenue that has been prone to flooding from big storms in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Clyde Forbes walks into the front of his house past a halloween pumkin and maniquen with a sign that reads "Die Sandy Die!" along a section of Rhode Island Avenue that has been prone to flooding from big storms in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • O'Connell's Restaurant server Mike Doran, of Waldorf, Md., takes care of customers as they watch the progress of Hurricane Sandy on the television in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)O'Connell's Restaurant server Mike Doran, of Waldorf, Md., takes care of customers as they watch the progress of Hurricane Sandy on the television in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • Se Kim [cq] with City Cleaners drags awnings that were removed for a renovation project to the back of the store away from the wind along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Se Kim [cq] with City Cleaners drags awnings that were removed for a renovation project to the back of the store away from the wind along Rhode Island Avenue in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Northwest, Washington, D.C., Monday, October 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy begins to affect the Washington, D.C. region. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • O'Connell's Restaurant General Manager Doug Gruenberg carries sand bags to put into place at the restaurant's doorsteps in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)O'Connell's Restaurant General Manager Doug Gruenberg carries sand bags to put into place at the restaurant's doorsteps in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • A woman tries to gain control of her umbrella in the wind in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)A woman tries to gain control of her umbrella in the wind in Old Town Alexandria, Va., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, while Hurricane Sandy makes it's way north along the Atlantic coast. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • Leo, left, 3, and Jason Lemus, 8, sit on their sofa in their Huntington, Va. home on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 surrounded by all the belongings from the basement, which their parents brought upstairs because they are sure their basement is going to flood due to Hurricane Sandy. Their basement flooded in September, and they said they had about 6 feet of water then. They are planning to go to a relative's house in Clinton, Md. if the house floods again. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Leo, left, 3, and Jason Lemus, 8, sit on their sofa in their Huntington, Va. home on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 surrounded by all the belongings from the basement, which their parents brought upstairs because they are sure their basement is going to flood due to Hurricane Sandy. Their basement flooded in September, and they said they had about 6 feet of water then. They are planning to go to a relative's house in Clinton, Md. if the house floods again. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • ** FILE ** Huntington, Va., resident Jose Lazo watches television updates on Hurricane Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)** FILE ** Huntington, Va., resident Jose Lazo watches television updates on Hurricane Sandy on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)
  • Charlie Priola, owner of Mangia's restaurant in Annapolis, Md., tries to protect his restaurant from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)Charlie Priola, owner of Mangia's restaurant in Annapolis, Md., tries to protect his restaurant from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • Sea foam washes over the beach as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Sea foam washes over the beach as Hurricane Sandy bears down on the East Coast, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Pedestrian who try to cover from the rain try to control his umbrella from the heavy wins in Baltimore downtown as Hurricane Sandy approach in the coast of Maryland, on Monday,  Oct. 29,  2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)Pedestrian who try to cover from the rain try to control his umbrella from the heavy wins in Baltimore downtown as Hurricane Sandy approach in the coast of Maryland, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
  • Anthony Reiner, of Annapolis, Md., tries to protect himself from rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Annapolis. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)Anthony Reiner, of Annapolis, Md., tries to protect himself from rain and wind from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Annapolis. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
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Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley issued a dire warning to residents on Monday, urging them to stay indoors as the storm caused by Hurricane Sandy blankets the state.

Mr. O'Malley, a Democrat, said he expects the storm to bring heavy rain, gusting winds and extensive damage to the state over the next 24 hours, and predicted it could bring grave consequences.

At a 9:30 p.m. news conference Monday, Mr. O'Malley and a forecaster with the National Weather Service said that while the storm had weakened and the state had endured battering winds and constant rainfall all day, the worst would come through the night.

“I feel like we’re only just now beginning the rough part of this storm,” Mr. O'Malley said from the Maryland Emergency Management Agency headquarters in Reisterstown. “The next 12 hours will most likely be the most intense.”

By Monday night, Mr. O'Malley said that 280,000 Marylanders were without power. And, he said, the center of the storm was forecast to travel through northern Maryland — specifically Cecil and Harford counties — through the night. Mr. O’Malley noted that half of the homes in these two counties are already without electricity.

The state has canceled early voting for Tuesday and state government will also be closed for all but essential personnel.

Earlier in the day, O'Malley did not mince words when talking about the storm.

“There will be people who die and are killed in this storm,” the governor said during a Monday morning news conference.

As of early Tuesday morning, at least 13 deaths were confirmed as a result of the storm. One was in Maryland, where Anne Arundel County fire officials say a man was killed when a tree fell on a house and trapped him in Pasadena. Anne Arundel County Division Chief Michael Cox said firefighters were called to the home at about 11 p.m. Monday. The male occupant was pronounced dead at the scene by fire personnel, Chief Cox said.

At about 4:45 a.m. Tuesday, Howard County fire and rescue crews took three people from a North Laurel home to the hospital for carbon monoxide poisoning. The people were apparently running a generator inside their home, without proper ventilation.

Mr. O'Malley repeated several times that the 12 hours between Monday night and Tuesday morning will be the most critical yet. His biggest concerns are coastal flooding and trees that “will no doubt crack and fall on the roofs of people’s houses.”

“For the night, the watchword is stay inside,” Mr. O'Malley said. “Don’t go outside. Don’t go on the road.”

The governor has already declared a state of emergency in Maryland and said he expects the night to bring many downed trees and thousands of power outages.

Mr. O'Malley said Pepco and BGE — the state’s two largest utilities — have brought in extra crews to help assess damage and restore power after the storm, but that many residents could remain in the dark long after the storm leaves the mid-Atlantic.

“Those crews can’t go up in those bucket trucks in 60-mile-an-hour winds, so this is going to be a long haul,” he said. “The days ahead are going to be very difficult.”

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