Sandy socks East Coast

Superstorm hits 50 million with rain and wind

  • The Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Memorial sits in flood waters in downtown Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after the superstorm and the remnants of Hurricane Sandy passed through Annapolis. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)The Kunta Kinte-Alex Haley Memorial sits in flood waters in downtown Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after the superstorm and the remnants of Hurricane Sandy passed through Annapolis. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  • This image from video provided by Dani Hart shows what appears to be a transformer exploding in lower Manhattan as seen from a building rooftop from the Navy Yard in Brooklyn during Sandy’s arrival in New York City. Much of New York was plunged into darkness Monday by a superstorm that overflowed the city's historic waterfront, flooded the financial district and subway tunnels and cut power to nearly a million people. (AP Photo/Dani Hart)
  • In this photo provided by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a surveillance camera captures the PATH station in Hoboken, N.J., as it is flooded shortly before 9:30 p.m. EDT on Oct. 29, 2012. (Associated Press/Port Authority of New York and New Jersey)In this photo provided by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a surveillance camera captures the PATH station in Hoboken, N.J., as it is flooded shortly before 9:30 p.m. EDT on Oct. 29, 2012. (Associated Press/Port Authority of New York and New Jersey)
  • Sea water floods the Ground Zero construction site, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)Sea water floods the Ground Zero construction site, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Lower Manhattan goes dark during hurricane Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from Brooklyn, N.Y. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)Lower Manhattan goes dark during hurricane Sandy, on Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as seen from Brooklyn, N.Y. Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Rick Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center, points to the satellite image of hurricane Sandy at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)Rick Knabb, director of the National Hurricane Center, points to the satellite image of hurricane Sandy at the National Hurricane Center in Miami, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)
  • Vehicles are submerged during a storm surge near the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Superstorm Sandy zeroed in on New York's waterfront with fierce rain and winds that shuttered most of the nation's largest city Monday, darkened the financial district and left a huge crane hanging off a luxury high-rise. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)Vehicles are submerged during a storm surge near the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Superstorm Sandy zeroed in on New York's waterfront with fierce rain and winds that shuttered most of the nation's largest city Monday, darkened the financial district and left a huge crane hanging off a luxury high-rise. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Rising water from the Hudson River overtakes a bank drive-through in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy lashed the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Rising water from the Hudson River overtakes a bank drive-through in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, as Hurricane Sandy lashed the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Flooding and high winds arrive along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Michael Ein) Flooding and high winds arrive along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Michael Ein)
  • The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is empty of traders, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. All major U.S. stock and options exchanges will remain closed Monday with Hurricane Sandy nearing landfall on the East Coast. Trading has rarely stopped for weather. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  • President Barack Obama receiving an update on the ongoing response to Hurricane Sandy, in the Situation Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 29 2012.  (AP Photo/Pete Souza, White House)President Barack Obama receiving an update on the ongoing response to Hurricane Sandy, in the Situation Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, Oct. 29 2012. (AP Photo/Pete Souza, White House)
  • Toll lanes are closed at Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which is closed because of winds from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)Toll lanes are closed at Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which is closed because of winds from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • Derek Seay, left, and Allen Moore, right, groundsmen for Dominion Virginia Power, check equipment on their truck Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in Richmond, Va., prior to heading out into the wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown).Derek Seay, left, and Allen Moore, right, groundsmen for Dominion Virginia Power, check equipment on their truck Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 in Richmond, Va., prior to heading out into the wind and rain from Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Richmond Times-Dispatch, Bob Brown).
  • An 18-wheel tractor trailer belonging to the Extra Good Transport Services, Inc. based in Columbia, Pa., sits on a median strip after jacknifing along I-81 about 1/4 mile north of the West Virginia/Virginia border near Ridgeway, W.Va. on Monday, Oct 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Journal, Ron Agnir)An 18-wheel tractor trailer belonging to the Extra Good Transport Services, Inc. based in Columbia, Pa., sits on a median strip after jacknifing along I-81 about 1/4 mile north of the West Virginia/Virginia border near Ridgeway, W.Va. on Monday, Oct 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Journal, Ron Agnir)
  • A FDNY firefighter and a New York police officer look up at a construction crane atop a luxury high-rise dangling precariously over the streets after collapsing in high winds from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York.  (AP Photo/John Minchillo)A FDNY firefighter and a New York police officer look up at a construction crane atop a luxury high-rise dangling precariously over the streets after collapsing in high winds from Hurricane Sandy, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
  • Diana Clarke sits on a cot set up by the Red Cross as she takes shelter from Hurricane Sandy at Weymouth High School in Weymouth, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)Diana Clarke sits on a cot set up by the Red Cross as she takes shelter from Hurricane Sandy at Weymouth High School in Weymouth, Mass. Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
  • An abandoned beach house that survived the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy sits off center in Nags Head, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. The storm continued on its path Monday, forcing  the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets,  and sending coastal residents fleeing. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)An abandoned beach house that survived the storm surge from Hurricane Sandy sits off center in Nags Head, N.C., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. The storm continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, and sending coastal residents fleeing. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
  • Homeowner Raymond Gara, left, and another man looks on as a tree sits on his house on Raubsville Road after strong storm winds brought on by Hurricane Sandy took it down, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Williams Township, Pa. (AP Photo/The Express-Times, Matt Smith)Homeowner Raymond Gara, left, and another man looks on as a tree sits on his house on Raubsville Road after strong storm winds brought on by Hurricane Sandy took it down, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Williams Township, Pa. (AP Photo/The Express-Times, Matt Smith)
  • People brace against a gust from Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn's Dumbo neighborhood Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Residents of the neighborhood were ordered to evacuate because of the storm surge expected from the hurricane. Authorities warned that New York City and Long Island could get the worst of the storm surge: an 11-foot onslaught of seawater that could swamp lower areas of the city. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)People brace against a gust from Hurricane Sandy in Brooklyn's Dumbo neighborhood Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in New York. Residents of the neighborhood were ordered to evacuate because of the storm surge expected from the hurricane. Authorities warned that New York City and Long Island could get the worst of the storm surge: an 11-foot onslaught of seawater that could swamp lower areas of the city. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • People run through a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)People run through a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, as the storm forced the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • A sign informs motorists along U.S. Route 50 that Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which connects the state's eastern and western shores, is closed because of winds from Hurricane Sandy Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.  (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)A sign informs motorists along U.S. Route 50 that Maryland's Chesapeake Bay Bridge, which connects the state's eastern and western shores, is closed because of winds from Hurricane Sandy Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • A row of houses stands in floodwaters at Grassy Sound in North Wildwood, N.J., as Hurricane Sandy pounds the East Coast Monday Oct. 29, 2012.  (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Dale Gerhard) A row of houses stands in floodwaters at Grassy Sound in North Wildwood, N.J., as Hurricane Sandy pounds the East Coast Monday Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Dale Gerhard)
  • Water from the Hudson River surrounds a hotel in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 as Hurricane Sandy lashes the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Water from the Hudson River surrounds a hotel in Edgewater, N.J., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 as Hurricane Sandy lashes the East Coast. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Jake Wilkerson, 20, and Kaityln Baker, 21, both of Annapolis, Md., struggle with their umbrellas as Hurricane Sandy approaches Annapolis Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)Jake Wilkerson, 20, and Kaityln Baker, 21, both of Annapolis, Md., struggle with their umbrellas as Hurricane Sandy approaches Annapolis Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • A few dozen people take refuge from Hurricane Sandy at a Red Cross shelter, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Deer Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)A few dozen people take refuge from Hurricane Sandy at a Red Cross shelter, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Deer Park, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Rehoboth Beach residents ride their bikes around the neighborhood in wet suits in Delaware, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.  (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)  Rehoboth Beach residents ride their bikes around the neighborhood in wet suits in Delaware, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)
  • A parking light lies collapsed on the ground from strong winds in Rehoboth Beach, Del., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)  A parking light lies collapsed on the ground from strong winds in Rehoboth Beach, Del., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)
  • A car is stuck in deep water on Wilmington Avenue in Rehoboth Beach, Del., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)  A car is stuck in deep water on Wilmington Avenue in Rehoboth Beach, Del., Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, Suchat Pederson)
  • U.S. Fuel gas station store manager Tsewang Guyrme, of Phillipsburg, N.J., wraps one of his newly installed Mobil gas tanks with bubble and shrink wrap, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, to protect them from possible flying debris in Phillipsburg. His station on Memorial Parkway is converting to a Mobil gas station. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Express-Times, Lisa Massey)U.S. Fuel gas station store manager Tsewang Guyrme, of Phillipsburg, N.J., wraps one of his newly installed Mobil gas tanks with bubble and shrink wrap, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, to protect them from possible flying debris in Phillipsburg. His station on Memorial Parkway is converting to a Mobil gas station. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Express-Times, Lisa Massey)
  • A downed limb lies in a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Center Moriches, N.Y.  (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)A downed limb lies in a flooded street as Hurricane Sandy approaches, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Center Moriches, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Snow plows move through the mountains of West Virginia Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Randolph County, W.Va. Sandy was set to collide with a wintry storm from the west and cold air streaming down from the Arctic. The combination superstorm could menace some 50 million people in the most heavily populated corridor in the nation, from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)Snow plows move through the mountains of West Virginia Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in Randolph County, W.Va. Sandy was set to collide with a wintry storm from the west and cold air streaming down from the Arctic. The combination superstorm could menace some 50 million people in the most heavily populated corridor in the nation, from the East Coast to the Great Lakes. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
  • Backpackers Dean Siornicke, left, and Leland Kinkade of Spring Hill, Fla., arrive at a trailhead after spending a snowy night Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, near v, Tenn. About 50 backpackers took shelter in the park during Sunday night's snowfall. Rangers expect more snow and high winds in the days to come as fallout from the storm pounding the East Coast.(AP Photo/Knoxville News Sentinel, J. Miles Cary)Backpackers Dean Siornicke, left, and Leland Kinkade of Spring Hill, Fla., arrive at a trailhead after spending a snowy night Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, near v, Tenn. About 50 backpackers took shelter in the park during Sunday night's snowfall. Rangers expect more snow and high winds in the days to come as fallout from the storm pounding the East Coast.(AP Photo/Knoxville News Sentinel, J. Miles Cary)
  • New Bedford, Mass., firefighters survey damage caused when high winds generated by Hurricane Sandy toppled a chimney through a skylight and into the kitchen of an apartment in New Bedford Monday, Oct. 29, 2012.  The apartments were evacuated, and no one was injured.  (AP Photo/The Standard-Times, Peter Pereira)New Bedford, Mass., firefighters survey damage caused when high winds generated by Hurricane Sandy toppled a chimney through a skylight and into the kitchen of an apartment in New Bedford Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. The apartments were evacuated, and no one was injured. (AP Photo/The Standard-Times, Peter Pereira)
  • Michael Wirtz, of Wilmington, Del., braves flood waters and high winds that arrive with Hurricane Sandy along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Michael Ein) MANDATORY CREDITMichael Wirtz, of Wilmington, Del., braves flood waters and high winds that arrive with Hurricane Sandy along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., Monday Oct. 29, 2012. Hurricane Sandy continued on its path Monday, forcing the shutdown of mass transit, schools and financial markets, sending coastal residents fleeing for higher ground, and threatening a dangerous mix of high winds and soaking rain. (AP Photo/The Press of Atlantic City, Michael Ein) MANDATORY CREDIT
  • A woman uses her mobile phone to photograph New York Harbor at Battery Park, at the southern tip of Manhattan, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Defiant New Yorkers jogged, pushed strollers and took snapshots of churning New York Harbor on Monday, trying to salvage normal routines in a city with no trains, schools and an approaching mammoth storm. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)A woman uses her mobile phone to photograph New York Harbor at Battery Park, at the southern tip of Manhattan, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012. Defiant New Yorkers jogged, pushed strollers and took snapshots of churning New York Harbor on Monday, trying to salvage normal routines in a city with no trains, schools and an approaching mammoth storm. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
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Swirling from the nation’s capital to New England, a hurricane-fueled superstorm struck the most populous region of the United States on Monday with the type of brute force that had been predicted for days, flooding roads and knocking out power to thousands in the D.C. region as top officials begged residents to respect nature’s wrath and seek shelter for themselves and their loved ones.

Hurricane Sandy collided with wintry air from the west and north to create a type of combination storm over the Eastern Seaboard, gaining strength in the process as about 50 million Americans prepared for its landfall and hoped for the best. With awesome force extending 1,000 miles from end to end, the tempest caused storm surges along coastal areas, inland zones feared falling trees and standing water, and heavy snow socked the Appalachian Mountains.

Densely populated areas from the Beltway to Boston quickly gave way to abandoned streets and shuttered stores, while some last-minute shoppers picked grocery shelves clean. More than 7,000 flights were grounded across the affected region, massive transit systems in the D.C. region and New York City locked their station doors, and schools and government offices planned to close again Tuesday.

The storm made landfall Monday night and was predicted to dump close to a foot of rain in the mid-Atlantic region and heavy snow in the mountains of West Virginia’s Eastern Panhandle by Tuesday night.

As of early Tuesday morning, at least 13 deaths were confirmed as a result of the storm. One was in Maryland, where Anne Arundel County fire officials say a man was killed when a tree fell on a house and trapped him in Pasadena. Anne Arundel County Division Chief Michael Cox said firefighters were called to the home at about 11 p.m. Monday. The male occupant was pronounced dead at the scene by fire personnel, Chief Cox said.

Howard County fire and rescue crews took three people from a North Laurel home to the hospital for carbon monoxide poisoning at about 4:45 a.m. Tuesday. The people were apparently running a generator inside their home, without proper ventilation.

In the Carolinas, the U.S. Coast Guard rescued 14 members by helicopter from the HMS Bounty, a replica 18th-century sailing ship that sank in the storm. The crew was forced to abandon the ship, which was built for the 1962 Marlon Brando film “Mutiny on the Bounty,” about 90 miles off the coast. The Coast Guard searched for two other crew members.

Farther north, the New York Stock Exchange was deserted and the storm’s projected path put New York City and Long Island in the danger zone for a huge surge of seawater made more fearsome by high tide and a full moon.

“This is the worst-case scenario,” said Louis Uccellini, environmental prediction chief for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

In a conference call, Mr. Uccellini added this is the only time he has seen a hurricane as strong as Sandy married with the type of heavy snowfall that areas in West Virginia and southwestern Virginia saw Monday.

Elected officials and forecasters said the storm’s effect could punish the region until Wednesday. Power crews, many of which traveled from Southern states less affected by the storm, cannot begin their work until conditions are safe, prompting some to worry whether Sandy’s aftermath will have an impact on the presidential election next week.

President Obama rushed out of the battleground state of Florida on Monday to return to Washington and oversee the storm response. He arrived just after 11 a.m. to huddle with top administration officials for a briefing on Hurricane Sandy’s progress and meet with Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate and other Cabinet members.

In a televised news conference, Mr. Obama implored citizens to listen to their state and local officials and dismissed talk of the storm’s potential impact on the Nov. 6 election.

“I’m worried about the impact on families and I’m worried about the impact on our first responders,” he said. “I’m worried about the impact on our economy and on transportation. The election will take care of itself next week.”

‘Very, very violent storm’

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