New York, New Jersey struggle to recover from Sandy

  • Robert Connolly, left, embraces his wife Laura as they survey the remains of the home owned by her parents that burned to the ground in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in the fire which swept through the oceanfront  community during superstorm Sandy. At right is their son, Kyle. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)Robert Connolly, left, embraces his wife Laura as they survey the remains of the home owned by her parents that burned to the ground in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in the fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. At right is their son, Kyle. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • This aerial photo shows destroyed houses left in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)This aerial photo shows destroyed houses left in the wake of superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
  • Marine One, carrying President Barack Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, takes an aerial tour of the Atlantic Coast in New Jersey in areas damaged by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, The New York Times, Pool)Marine One, carrying President Barack Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, takes an aerial tour of the Atlantic Coast in New Jersey in areas damaged by superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, The New York Times, Pool)
  • ** FILE ** President Barack Obama, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, second from left, and others, speaks about superstorm Sandy during a visit to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)** FILE ** President Barack Obama, accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, second from left, and others, speaks about superstorm Sandy during a visit to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • The view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J.,  Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)The view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)
  • People survey the destruction left in the wake of Superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)People survey the destruction left in the wake of Superstorm Sandy on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
  • People line up to fill gas containers at the New Jersey Turnpike's Thomas A. Edison service area Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, near Woodbridge, N.J. After Monday's storm surge from Sandy, many gas stations in the region are without power and those that are open have very long lines. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)People line up to fill gas containers at the New Jersey Turnpike's Thomas A. Edison service area Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, near Woodbridge, N.J. After Monday's storm surge from Sandy, many gas stations in the region are without power and those that are open have very long lines. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • People help push John Oh's van to the pumps at the New Jersey Turnpike's Thomas A. Edison service area Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, near Woodbridge, N.J., after Oh, of Blue Bell, Pa., ran out of gas waiting in a long line near exit 11. After Monday's storm surge from Sandy, many gas stations in the region are without power and those that are open have very long lines. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)People help push John Oh's van to the pumps at the New Jersey Turnpike's Thomas A. Edison service area Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, near Woodbridge, N.J., after Oh, of Blue Bell, Pa., ran out of gas waiting in a long line near exit 11. After Monday's storm surge from Sandy, many gas stations in the region are without power and those that are open have very long lines. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • A customer browses food piled into shopping carts on Brighton Beach Avenue, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. People in the coastal corridor battered by superstorm Sandy took the first cautious steps Wednesday to reclaim routines upended by the disaster, even as rescuers combed neighborhoods strewn with debris and scarred by floods and fire. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)A customer browses food piled into shopping carts on Brighton Beach Avenue, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. People in the coastal corridor battered by superstorm Sandy took the first cautious steps Wednesday to reclaim routines upended by the disaster, even as rescuers combed neighborhoods strewn with debris and scarred by floods and fire. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • The view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J.,  Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy.   (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)The view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)
  • This aerial view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J.,  Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, taken from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)This aerial view of storm damage over the Atlantic Coast in Seaside Heights, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, taken from a helicopter traveling behind the helicopter carrying President Obama and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, as they viewed storm damage from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Doug Mills, Pool)
  • President Barack Obama, accompanied by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie meets with local residents at the Brigantine Beach Community Center in Brigantine, NJ., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Obama traveled to Atlantic Coast to see first-hand the relief efforts after Superstorm Sandy damage the Atlantic Coast. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)President Barack Obama, accompanied by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie meets with local residents at the Brigantine Beach Community Center in Brigantine, NJ., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Obama traveled to Atlantic Coast to see first-hand the relief efforts after Superstorm Sandy damage the Atlantic Coast. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
  • A patient is taken to a waiting medical transport vehicle outside Bellevue Hospital in New York Wednesday Oct. 31, 2012. Mayor Michael Bloomberg says Bellevue Hospital is evacuating 500 patients due to storm damage. Bloomberg said Wednesday that officials are in the process of finding beds for the patients. Workers have been pumping about 17 million gallons of water out of the basement. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)A patient is taken to a waiting medical transport vehicle outside Bellevue Hospital in New York Wednesday Oct. 31, 2012. Mayor Michael Bloomberg says Bellevue Hospital is evacuating 500 patients due to storm damage. Bloomberg said Wednesday that officials are in the process of finding beds for the patients. Workers have been pumping about 17 million gallons of water out of the basement. (AP Photo/Tina Fineberg)
  • This Oct. 30, 2012 aerial photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows damage to the New Jersey shoreline during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard. By late Tuesday, the winds and flooding inflicted by the fast-weakening superstorm Sandy had subsided, leaving at least 55 people dead along the Atlantic Coast and splintering beachfront homes and boardwalks from the mid-Atlantic states to southern New England. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)This Oct. 30, 2012 aerial photo provided by the U.S. Air Force shows damage to the New Jersey shoreline during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard. By late Tuesday, the winds and flooding inflicted by the fast-weakening superstorm Sandy had subsided, leaving at least 55 people dead along the Atlantic Coast and splintering beachfront homes and boardwalks from the mid-Atlantic states to southern New England. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)
  • Workers try to clear boats and debris from the New Jersey Transit's Morgan draw bridge Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in South Amboy, N.J., after Monday's storm surge from Sandy pushed boats and cargo containers onto the train tracks. New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line, which provides train service from the New Jersey shore towns to New York City, may experience prolonged disruption because of the extensive damage. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Workers try to clear boats and debris from the New Jersey Transit's Morgan draw bridge Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in South Amboy, N.J., after Monday's storm surge from Sandy pushed boats and cargo containers onto the train tracks. New Jersey Transit's North Jersey Coast Line, which provides train service from the New Jersey shore towns to New York City, may experience prolonged disruption because of the extensive damage. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo, right, adjusts his shoulder straps as he prepares to take a flight in a New York Air National Guard helicopter Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in New York. The governor was joined by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-NY, and local officials for the flight over the city, Nassau and Westchester counties to get an assessment of damages from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)Gov. Andrew Cuomo, right, adjusts his shoulder straps as he prepares to take a flight in a New York Air National Guard helicopter Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in New York. The governor was joined by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-NY, and local officials for the flight over the city, Nassau and Westchester counties to get an assessment of damages from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • This Oct. 30, 2012 aerial photo provided by the U.S.Air Force shows flooding on the New Jersey shoreline during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard. By late Tuesday, the winds and flooding inflicted by the fast-weakening Superstorm Sandy had subsided, leaving at least 55 people dead along the Atlantic Coast and splintering beachfront homes and boardwalks from the mid-Atlantic states to southern New England. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)This Oct. 30, 2012 aerial photo provided by the U.S.Air Force shows flooding on the New Jersey shoreline during a search and rescue mission by 1-150 Assault Helicopter Battalion, New Jersey Army National Guard. By late Tuesday, the winds and flooding inflicted by the fast-weakening Superstorm Sandy had subsided, leaving at least 55 people dead along the Atlantic Coast and splintering beachfront homes and boardwalks from the mid-Atlantic states to southern New England. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, Master Sgt. Mark C. Olsen)
  • A cleanup crew works to figure out how to remove power lines and trees off a summer cottage on Lake Webster, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Franklin, N.H. By midday Wednesday, utilities brought the number of New Hampshire homes and businesses without power down to 70,000 from a peak of 210,000. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)A cleanup crew works to figure out how to remove power lines and trees off a summer cottage on Lake Webster, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012 in Franklin, N.H. By midday Wednesday, utilities brought the number of New Hampshire homes and businesses without power down to 70,000 from a peak of 210,000. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • This aerial photo shows destruction left in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)This aerial photo shows destruction left in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Seaside Heights, N.J. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
  • Certified Public Accountant John Sterling looks at damaged boxes of records removed from his office after superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Crisfield, Md. Most of the records were old and on their way to the shredder he said. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Certified Public Accountant John Sterling looks at damaged boxes of records removed from his office after superstorm Sandy, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Crisfield, Md. Most of the records were old and on their way to the shredder he said. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • In this aerial photo, upended boats are piled together at a marina along the central New Jersey shore on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. New Jersey got the brunt of superstorm Sandy, which made landfall in the state and killed six people. More than 2 million customers were without power as of Wednesday afternoon, down from a peak of 2.7 million. (AP Photo/Mike Groll) In this aerial photo, upended boats are piled together at a marina along the central New Jersey shore on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. New Jersey got the brunt of superstorm Sandy, which made landfall in the state and killed six people. More than 2 million customers were without power as of Wednesday afternoon, down from a peak of 2.7 million. (AP Photo/Mike Groll)
  • This Oct. 30, 2012, photo provided by New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) shows damage to the South Ferry station of the No. 1 subway line, in lower Manhattan, after Superstorm Sandy passed through New York. Floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history but on Wednesday Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced limited subway service will resume on Thursday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Patrick Cashin)This Oct. 30, 2012, photo provided by New York's Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) shows damage to the South Ferry station of the No. 1 subway line, in lower Manhattan, after Superstorm Sandy passed through New York. Floodwaters that poured into New York's deepest subway tunnels may pose the biggest obstacle to the city's recovery from the worst natural disaster in the transit system's 108-year history but on Wednesday Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced limited subway service will resume on Thursday. (AP Photo/Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Patrick Cashin)
  • A truck makes it way through a snow-covered road in Beaver, W.Va., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Superstorm Sandy has already dumped up to 2 feet of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 271,00 customers and closing dozens of roads. (AP Photo/The Register-Herald, Rick Barbero)A truck makes it way through a snow-covered road in Beaver, W.Va., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Superstorm Sandy has already dumped up to 2 feet of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 271,00 customers and closing dozens of roads. (AP Photo/The Register-Herald, Rick Barbero)
  • New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to traders before ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange in New York on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg talks to traders before ringing the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange in New York on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Homes in Fenwick Island, Del. are surrounded by floodwaters from superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Officials said Fenwick Island and nearby Bethany Beach appeared to be among the hardest-hit parts of the state. Gov. Jack Markell lifted the state of emergency on Tuesday in New Castle and Kent counties, but has kept the order in place for Sussex County because some areas remain flooded from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Randall Chase)Homes in Fenwick Island, Del. are surrounded by floodwaters from superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Officials said Fenwick Island and nearby Bethany Beach appeared to be among the hardest-hit parts of the state. Gov. Jack Markell lifted the state of emergency on Tuesday in New Castle and Kent counties, but has kept the order in place for Sussex County because some areas remain flooded from superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Randall Chase)
  • President Barack Obama, accompanied by members of his Cabinet, speaks at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, to discuss the recent superstorm Sandy. From left are, the president, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)President Barack Obama, accompanied by members of his Cabinet, speaks at the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Headquarters in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, to discuss the recent superstorm Sandy. From left are, the president, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, and Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  • Downed power lines and a battered road is what superstorm Sandy left behind as people walk off the flooded Seaside Heights island, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Downed power lines and a battered road is what superstorm Sandy left behind as people walk off the flooded Seaside Heights island, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • Members of the National Guard and Hoboken Police ride a large truck through floodwaters used to pluck people from high water in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Members of the National Guard and Hoboken Police ride a large truck through floodwaters used to pluck people from high water in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Parts of the city are still covered in standing water, trapping some residents in their homes. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • David Bagatelle, of Hoboken, N.J., walks from his residence on Park Avenue through high water in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Bagatelle's home is surrounded by water, but dry, where his wife and 7day-old baby are staying. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)David Bagatelle, of Hoboken, N.J., walks from his residence on Park Avenue through high water in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Bagatelle's home is surrounded by water, but dry, where his wife and 7day-old baby are staying. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • The twisted remains of a Hudson River marina are seen across from New York City as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)The twisted remains of a Hudson River marina are seen across from New York City as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)
  • Vihaan Gadodia, 2, is handed from a National Guard truck after he and his family left a flooded building in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Some residents are being plucked from their homes by large trucks as parts of the city are still covered in standing water. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Vihaan Gadodia, 2, is handed from a National Guard truck after he and his family left a flooded building in Hoboken, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Some residents are being plucked from their homes by large trucks as parts of the city are still covered in standing water. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Stock quotes and traders in seen reflected in monitors on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012.  Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of Hurricane Sandy.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Stock quotes and traders in seen reflected in monitors on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Ellen Hoffman, left, and James Gibson cast their ballots at a polling place at the Wicomico County Youth and Civic Center in Salisbury, Md., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012,  after superstorm Sandy passed through the area. Early voting resumed in Maryland Wednesday after two days of cancellations due to superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Ellen Hoffman, left, and James Gibson cast their ballots at a polling place at the Wicomico County Youth and Civic Center in Salisbury, Md., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, after superstorm Sandy passed through the area. Early voting resumed in Maryland Wednesday after two days of cancellations due to superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of Hurricane Sandy.   (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Traders work on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. Traffic is snarled, subways out of commission, streets flooded and power out in many parts of the city, but the New York Stock Exchange opened without hitch Wednesday after an historic two-day shutdown, courtesy of Hurricane Sandy. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Collin O'Mara briefs Gov. Jack Markell, right, and Lt. Gov. Matt Denn as they tour Delaware's shores by National Guard Blackhawk helicopter in the wake of Sandy, Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 30, 2012, in Bethany Beach, Del. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, William Bretzger)  Collin O'Mara briefs Gov. Jack Markell, right, and Lt. Gov. Matt Denn as they tour Delaware's shores by National GuardBlackhawk helicopter in the wake of Sandy, Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 30, 2012, in Bethany Beach, Del. (AP Photo/The Wilmington News-Journal, William Bretzger)
  • A car is partially buried by sand that was washed ashore by superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)A car is partially buried by sand that was washed ashore by superstorm Sandy in Atlantic City, N.J., Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
  • This photo made available by the New Jersey Governor's Office shows damage to the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 after superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey Monday evening. (AP Photo/New Jersey Governor's Office, Tim Larsen)This photo made available by the New Jersey Governor's Office shows damage to the boardwalk in Seaside Heights, N.J. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 after superstorm Sandy made landfall in New Jersey Monday evening. (AP Photo/New Jersey Governor's Office, Tim Larsen)
  • Rescue workers help stranded people out of their flooded homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., following the arrival of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Rescue workers help stranded people out of their flooded homes in Seaside Heights, N.J., following the arrival of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • A police car patrols in front of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, before it reopens for trading for the first time this week following a two-day shutdown due to superstorm Sandy. Stock futures are rising ahead of the opening bell. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

A police car patrols in front of the New York Stock Exchange, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, before it reopens for trading for the first time this week following a two-day shutdown due to superstorm Sandy. Stock futures are rising ahead of the opening bell. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • Brian Hajeski, 41, of Brick, N.J., reacts after looking at debris of a home that washed up on to the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Brian Hajeski, 41, of Brick, N.J., reacts after looking at debris of a home that washed up on to the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • A fire fighter surveys the smoldering ruins of a house in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront  community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)A fire fighter surveys the smoldering ruins of a house in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)A parking lot full of yellow cabs is flooded as a result of superstorm Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in Hoboken, NJ. (AP Photo/Charles Sykes)
  • North Carolina 12 is buckled from pounding surf leading into Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. People on North Carolina's Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. North Carolina Transportation Department spokeswoman Greer Beaty said the highway was closed Tuesday until crews inspect the road. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)North Carolina 12 is buckled from pounding surf leading into Mirlo Beach in Rodanthe, N.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. People on North Carolina's Outer Banks are facing some flooding and damage from Hurricane Sandy, but emergency management officials say it could have been worse. North Carolina Transportation Department spokeswoman Greer Beaty said the highway was closed Tuesday until crews inspect the road. (AP Photo/The Virginian-Pilot, Steve Earley)
  • Joe and Linda Bays shovel snow in front of their home in Beckley, W.Va. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The storm that hit late Monday and into Tuesday dumped up to 19 inches of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 271,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. One storm-related death was reported. (AP Photo/Jon C. Hancock)Joe and Linda Bays shovel snow in front of their home in Beckley, W.Va. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The storm that hit late Monday and into Tuesday dumped up to 19 inches of snow in West Virginia, cutting electricity to about 271,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. One storm-related death was reported. (AP Photo/Jon C. Hancock)
  • This NOAA satellite image taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, shows superstorm Sandy slowly moving westward while weakening across southern Pennsylvania. The National Weather Service said a foot and more of snow was reported in lower elevations of West Virginia, where most towns and roads are. High elevations in the mountains were getting more than two feet and a blizzard warning for more than a dozen counties was in effect until Wednesday afternoon. (AP Photo/NOAA)This NOAA satellite image taken Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, shows superstorm Sandy slowly moving westward while weakening across southern Pennsylvania. The National Weather Service said a foot and more of snow was reported in lower elevations of West Virginia, where most towns and roads are. High elevations in the mountains were getting more than two feet and a blizzard warning for more than a dozen counties was in effect until Wednesday afternoon. (AP Photo/NOAA)
  • Jason Locke sweeps water and mud from his parents' home in Westport, Mass., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Many homeowners who suffered losses because of flooding from Hurricane Sandy are likely to find themselves out of luck. Standard homeowners policies don't cover flooding damage, and the vast majority of homeowners don't have flood insurance.Yet it's likely that many Northeasterners will purchase it in coming months, hoping they'll be covered the next time around, at a cost averaging around $600 a year. (AP Photo/The Standard Times, Peter Pereira)Jason Locke sweeps water and mud from his parents' home in Westport, Mass., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Many homeowners who suffered losses because of flooding from Hurricane Sandy are likely to find themselves out of luck. Standard homeowners policies don't cover flooding damage, and the vast majority of homeowners don't have flood insurance.Yet it's likely that many Northeasterners will purchase it in coming months, hoping they'll be covered the next time around, at a cost averaging around $600 a year. (AP Photo/The Standard Times, Peter Pereira)
  • Floodwaters surround homes near the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)Floodwaters surround homes near the Mantoloking Bridge the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • A lone home sits on the beach in an area that residents say was filled with homes but are now gone the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Debris from Betty Wagner's home, lower right, rests on top of the Mantoloking Bridge. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)A lone home sits on the beach in an area that residents say was filled with homes but are now gone the morning after superstorm Sandy rolled through, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Mantoloking, N.J. Debris from Betty Wagner's home, lower right, rests on top of the Mantoloking Bridge. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
  • People, some waving to those on dry ground, are rescued by boat in Little Ferry, N.J. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)People, some waving to those on dry ground, are rescued by boat in Little Ferry, N.J. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012 in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • A sign for Ocean Avenue stands in the smoldering ruins of houses in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront  community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)A sign for Ocean Avenue stands in the smoldering ruins of houses in the Breezy Point section of New York, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. More than 50 homes were destroyed in a fire which swept through the oceanfront community during superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
  • Pleasure boats pile up 30 yards or more from the waterís edge in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the Cliffwood Beach section of Aberdeen, N.J. The storm's high winds and the high astronomical tide paired up to rip the boats away from their dock and deposit them on shore. (AP Photo/Peter Hermann, III) Pleasure boats pile up 30 yards or more from the waterís edge in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the Cliffwood Beach section of Aberdeen, N.J. The storm's high winds and the high astronomical tide paired up to rip the boats away from their dock and deposit them on shore. (AP Photo/Peter Hermann, III)
  • A police officer watch as a passerby look into a store through a damaged security grate, in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, on Mermaid Avenue in Coney Island, N.Y.  Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)A police officer watch as a passerby look into a store through a damaged security grate, in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, on Mermaid Avenue in Coney Island, N.Y. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
  • Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Foundations and pilings are all that remain of brick buildings and a boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, after they were destroyed when a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the East Coast on Monday night. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Olivia Loesner, 16, hugs her uncle, Little Ferry Deputy Fire Chief John Ruff, after she was brought from her flooded home in a boat in Little Ferry, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. At right carrying pets, is her mother, Janice Loesner. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Olivia Loesner, 16, hugs her uncle, Little Ferry Deputy Fire Chief John Ruff, after she was brought from her flooded home in a boat in Little Ferry, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. At right carrying pets, is her mother, Janice Loesner. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • Cars are submerged at the entrance to a parking garage in New York's Financial District in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels.   (AP Photo/Richard Drew)Cars are submerged at the entrance to a parking garage in New York's Financial District in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
  • Waves pound a lighthouse on the shores of Lake Erie Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, near Cleveland. High winds spinning off the edge of superstorm Sandy took a vicious swipe at northeast Ohio early Tuesday, uprooting trees, cutting power to hundreds of thousands, closing schools and flooding parts of major commuter arteries that run along Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)Waves pound a lighthouse on the shores of Lake Erie Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, near Cleveland. High winds spinning off the edge of superstorm Sandy took a vicious swipe at northeast Ohio early Tuesday, uprooting trees, cutting power to hundreds of thousands, closing schools and flooding parts of major commuter arteries that run along Lake Erie. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
  • Rescuers bring people out by boat in Little Ferry, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)Rescuers bring people out by boat in Little Ferry, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the wake of superstorm Sandy. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
  • A 168-foot water tanker, the John B. Caddell, sits on the shore Tuesday morning, Oct. 30, 2012 where it ran aground on Front Street in the Stapleton neighborhood of New York's Staten Island as a result of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Sean Sweeney) A 168-foot water tanker, the John B. Caddell, sits on the shore Tuesday morning, Oct. 30, 2012 where it ran aground on Front Street in the Stapleton neighborhood of New York's Staten Island as a result of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Sean Sweeney)
  • A for sale sign sits near flooded trailer homes in South Kingstown, R.I., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Beach cottages were destroyed, businesses were flooded and a quarter of the state was without power Tuesday after superstorm Sandy blew through Rhode Island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)A for sale sign sits near flooded trailer homes in South Kingstown, R.I., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Beach cottages were destroyed, businesses were flooded and a quarter of the state was without power Tuesday after superstorm Sandy blew through Rhode Island. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
  • A photograph floats just below the surface of a flooded street in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Massapequa, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)A photograph floats just below the surface of a flooded street in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Massapequa, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Sand and debris covers the streets near the water in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm which was downgraded from a hurricane just before making landfall, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Sand and debris covers the streets near the water in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm which was downgraded from a hurricane just before making landfall, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Workers clear debris outside the Consolidated Edison power sub-station on 14th Street, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)Workers clear debris outside the Consolidated Edison power sub-station on 14th Street, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Nicholas Rodriguez looks over a section of the destroyed boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, not far from where a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall the night before. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without electricity, but the full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore Monday night with hurricane force, was unclear. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Nicholas Rodriguez looks over a section of the destroyed boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, not far from where a powerful storm that started out as Hurricane Sandy made landfall the night before. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without electricity, but the full extent of the damage in New Jersey, where the storm roared ashore Monday night with hurricane force, was unclear. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • A park floods along the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace, Md. is flooded as the aftermath of superstorm Sandy continues to disrupt routines on the East Coast Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)A park floods along the Susquehanna River in Havre de Grace, Md. is flooded as the aftermath of superstorm Sandy continues to disrupt routines on the East Coast Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
  • A patient is wheeled to an ambulance in the rain during an evacuation of New York University Tisch Medical, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)A patient is wheeled to an ambulance in the rain during an evacuation of New York University Tisch Medical, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Onlookers take photographs of two cars that collided during flooding outside the Consolidated Edison power sub-station on 14th Street, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)Onlookers take photographs of two cars that collided during flooding outside the Consolidated Edison power sub-station on 14th Street, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Hurricane Sandy marched slowly inland, leaving millions without power or mass transit, with huge swatches of the nation's largest city unusually vacant and dark. New York was among the hardest hit, with its financial heart in Lower Manhattan shuttered for a second day and seawater cascading into the still-gaping construction pit at the World Trade Center (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • An ambulance is stuck in over a foot of snow off of Highway 33 West, near Belington, W.Va. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Belington, W.Va. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, cutting power to at least 264,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. At least one death was reported. The storm not only hit higher elevations hard as predicted, communities in lower elevations got much more than the dusting of snow forecasters had first thought from a dangerous system that also brought significant rainfall, high wind gusts and small-stream flooding. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)An ambulance is stuck in over a foot of snow off of Highway 33 West, near Belington, W.Va. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Belington, W.Va. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, cutting power to at least 264,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. At least one death was reported. The storm not only hit higher elevations hard as predicted, communities in lower elevations got much more than the dusting of snow forecasters had first thought from a dangerous system that also brought significant rainfall, high wind gusts and small-stream flooding. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
  • A man passes by a fallen tree on 14th Street SW on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, the day after Hurricane Sandy slammed into the region. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
A man passes by a fallen tree on 14th Street SW on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, the day after Hurricane Sandy slammed into the region. (Rod Lamkey Jr./The Washington Times)
  • Glenn Heartley watches floodwaters from superstorm Sandy pour out of his car after it was pulled out of a creek in Chincoteague, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012.  Heartley and his wife were swept off the road into a shallow creek during Monday's storm. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)Glenn Heartley watches floodwaters from superstorm Sandy pour out of his car after it was pulled out of a creek in Chincoteague, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Heartley and his wife were swept off the road into a shallow creek during Monday's storm. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • Crews work to clean up downed power lines in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Milton, N.H. Thousands of New Hampshire residents and businesses are without power. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)Crews work to clean up downed power lines in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Milton, N.H. Thousands of New Hampshire residents and businesses are without power. (AP Photo/Jim Cole)
  • Tractor trailer traffic was halted along Interstate 68 in Frostburg, Md., on Oct. 30, 2012 due to the storm. Wet snow and high winds spinning off the edge of superstorm Sandy spread blizzard conditions over parts of West Virginia and neighboring Appalachian states Tuesday. Authorities closed nearly 50 miles of Interstate 68 on either side of the West Virginia-Maryland state line because of blizzard conditions and stuck cars. Eastbound lanes in Maryland ere later reopened. (AP Photo/Cumberland Times-News, Steven Bittner) WHAG-TV OUTTractor trailer traffic was halted along Interstate 68 in Frostburg, Md., on Oct. 30, 2012 due to the storm. Wet snow and high winds spinning off the edge of superstorm Sandy spread blizzard conditions over parts of West Virginia and neighboring Appalachian states Tuesday. Authorities closed nearly 50 miles of Interstate 68 on either side of the West Virginia-Maryland state line because of blizzard conditions and stuck cars. Eastbound lanes in Maryland ere later reopened. (AP Photo/Cumberland Times-News, Steven Bittner) WHAG-TV OUT
  • Halloween decorations are seen during a snowstorm, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Elkins, W.Va. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, cutting power to at least 243,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. At least one death was reported. (AP Photo/Vicki Smith)Halloween decorations are seen during a snowstorm, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Elkins, W.Va. Superstorm Sandy buried parts of West Virginia under more than a foot of snow on Tuesday, cutting power to at least 243,000 customers and closing dozens of roads. At least one death was reported. (AP Photo/Vicki Smith)
  • Crews work to remove a damaged sign in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Philadelphia. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without power, and an eerily quiet New York City was all but closed off by car, train and air as superstorm Sandy steamed inland, still delivering punishing wind and rain.(AP Photo/Matt Slocum)Crews work to remove a damaged sign in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Philadelphia. Millions of people from Maine to the Carolinas awoke Tuesday without power, and an eerily quiet New York City was all but closed off by car, train and air as superstorm Sandy steamed inland, still delivering punishing wind and rain.(AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
  • Glenn Heartley pulls on a rope attached to his car in preparation for getting it towed from a creek in Chincoteague, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Heartley and his wife were swept off the road into the shallow creek during superstorm Sandy's arrival Monday. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)Glenn Heartley pulls on a rope attached to his car in preparation for getting it towed from a creek in Chincoteague, Va., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Heartley and his wife were swept off the road into the shallow creek during superstorm Sandy's arrival Monday. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
  • Utility crews work on damaged power lines in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy in Berlin, Md. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Utility crews work on damaged power lines in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy in Berlin, Md. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Andrea Grolon walks through waist-deep water in the Metropolitan Trailer Park in Moonachie, N.J. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Grolon, a resident of the trailer park, was wading through oil covered water to help others get to rescue vehicles in the wake of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Craig RuttleAndrea Grolon walks through waist-deep water in the Metropolitan Trailer Park in Moonachie, N.J. on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Grolon, a resident of the trailer park, was wading through oil covered water to help others get to rescue vehicles in the wake of superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle
  • A boat lies toppled between two flooded houses in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)A boat lies toppled between two flooded houses in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • A pedestrian passes a fallen tree on East 7th Street in Manhattan's Lower East Side neighborhood, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)A pedestrian passes a fallen tree on East 7th Street in Manhattan's Lower East Side neighborhood, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • A fallen tree rests beside a parked car on East Broadway in Manhattan's Lower East Side neighborhood, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels.  (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)A fallen tree rests beside a parked car on East Broadway in Manhattan's Lower East Side neighborhood, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. New York City awakened Tuesday to a flooded subway system, shuttered financial markets and hundreds of thousands of people without power a day after a wall of seawater and high winds slammed into the city, destroying buildings and flooding tunnels. (AP Photo/ John Minchillo)
  • Firefighters work at the scene of a house fire in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. According to firefighters at the scene, four homes were destroyed by fire overnight in Lindenhurst, and six in Massapequa. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)Firefighters work at the scene of a house fire in the aftermath of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Lindenhurst, N.Y. According to firefighters at the scene, four homes were destroyed by fire overnight in Lindenhurst, and six in Massapequa. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Kim Johnson looks over the destruction near her seaside apartment in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)Kim Johnson looks over the destruction near her seaside apartment in Atlantic City, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • Snowplows thunder through the mountains of West Virginia as the superstorm strikes the region on Monday evening, Oct. 29, 2012. In the higher elevations of the mountains, there could be from 2 to 3 feet of snow and blizzard conditions through Tuesday. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
Snowplows thunder through the mountains of West Virginia as the superstorm strikes the region on Monday evening, Oct. 29, 2012. In the higher elevations of the mountains, there could be from 2 to 3 feet of snow and blizzard conditions through Tuesday. (AP Photo/Robert Ray)
  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire in the Breezy Point section, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Damage caused by a fire at Breezy Point is shown Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. A fire department spokesman says more than 190 firefighters are at the blaze in the Breezy Point section. Fire officials say the blaze was reported around 11 p.m. Monday in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • A National Guard humvee travels through high water to check the area after the effects of Hurricane Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Ocean City, Md.  Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)A National Guard humvee travels through high water to check the area after the effects of Hurricane Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Ocean City, Md. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
  • Sveinn Storm, owner of Storm Bros. Ice Cream Factory measures the flood waters outside his store in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the aftermath of  Superstorm Sandy that passed through the East Coast.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)Sveinn Storm, owner of Storm Bros. Ice Cream Factory measures the flood waters outside his store in Annapolis, Md., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy that passed through the East Coast. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
  • Elaine Belviso, 72, is rescued from her flooded home by Suffolk County police after being trapped there overnight by superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Babylon, N.Y. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)Elaine Belviso, 72, is rescued from her flooded home by Suffolk County police after being trapped there overnight by superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in Babylon, N.Y. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing a number of deaths. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • A keep off the dunes sign is buried Tuesday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from superstormSandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and into the streets. The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 7.4 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)A keep off the dunes sign is buried Tuesday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from superstormSandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and into the streets. The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 7.4 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Workers use heavy machinery to clean up damage from superstorm Sandy Tuesday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and across Beach Avenue.  (AP Photo/Mel Evans)Workers use heavy machinery to clean up damage from superstorm Sandy Tuesday morning, Oct. 29, 2012, in Cape May, N.J., after a storm surge from Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean over the beach and across Beach Avenue. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)
  • Boats lie piled up as people work to secure a fuel dock in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in West Babylon, N.Y. The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 7.4 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)Boats lie piled up as people work to secure a fuel dock in the wake of superstorm Sandy, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in West Babylon, N.Y. The storm that made landfall in New Jersey on Monday evening with 80 mph sustained winds killed at least 16 people in seven states, cut power to more than 7.4 million homes and businesses from the Carolinas to Ohio, caused scares at two nuclear power plants and stopped the presidential campaign cold. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)
  • Keith Klein, right, and Eileen Blair assess the damage caused by a fire in the New York City borough of Queens, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II) Keith Klein, right, and Eileen Blair assess the damage caused by a fire in the New York City borough of Queens, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • Homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens smolder Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point, in the New York City borough of Queens smolder Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. More than 190 firefighters have contained the six-alarm blaze fire, but they are still putting out some pockets of fire. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • Keith Klein walks through homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Keith Klein walks through homes damaged by a fire at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • Damage from flooding at Breezy Point after superstorm Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the New York City borough of Queens.The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Damage from flooding at Breezy Point after superstorm Sandy Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in the New York City borough of Queens.The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in the flooded neighborhood. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • Members of the Wrightsville Fire Department, York County, Pa., Garret Ishman, from left, Ricky Brown and Jon Boyer look at the local emergency logs and listen to the scanner around 2 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, for any damage from superstorm Sandy, in Wrightsville, Pa. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing at least 18 deaths. (AP Photo/York Daily Record, Jason Plotkin) Members of the Wrightsville Fire Department, York County, Pa., Garret Ishman, from left, Ricky Brown and Jon Boyer look at the local emergency logs and listen to the scanner around 2 a.m., Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, for any damage from superstorm Sandy, in Wrightsville, Pa. Sandy arrived along the East Coast and morphed into a huge and problematic system, putting more than 7.5 million homes and businesses in the dark and causing at least 18 deaths. (AP Photo/York Daily Record, Jason Plotkin)
  • Water reaches street level at the West Street entrance to the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)Water reaches street level at the West Street entrance to the Battery Park Underpass, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012, in New York. Sandy, the storm that made landfall Monday, caused multiple fatalities, halted mass transit and cut power to more than 6 million homes and businesses. (AP Photo/ Louis Lanzano)
  • A man photographs a home damaged during a storm at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012.  The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)A man photographs a home damaged during a storm at Breezy Point in the New York City borough of Queens Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2012. The fire destroyed between 80 and 100 houses Monday night in an area flooded by the superstorm that began sweeping through earlier. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
  • President Barack Obama is greeted by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie upon his arrival at Atlantic City International Airport, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Atlantic City, N.J.. Obama traveled to the region to take an aerial tour of the Atlantic Coast in New Jersey in areas damaged by superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)President Barack Obama is greeted by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie upon his arrival at Atlantic City International Airport, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2012, in Atlantic City, N.J.. Obama traveled to the region to take an aerial tour of the Atlantic Coast in New Jersey in areas damaged by superstorm Sandy. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

NEW YORK (AP) — Two major airports reopened and the floor of the New York Stock Exchange came back to life Wednesday, while across the river in New Jersey, National Guardsmen rushed to rescue flood victims and fires still raged two days after Superstorm Sandy.

For the first time since the storm battered the Northeast, killing at least 59 people and doing billions of dollars in damage, brilliant sunshine washed over the nation’s largest city — a striking sight after days of gray skies, rain and wind.

At the stock exchange, running on generator power, Mayor Michael Bloomberg gave a thumbs-up and rang the opening bell to whoops from traders on the floor. Trading resumed after the first two-day weather shutdown since the Blizzard of 1888.

Kennedy and Newark Liberty airports reopened with limited service just after 7 a.m. New York’s LaGuardia Airport, which suffered far worse damage and where water covered parts of runways, remained closed.

It was clear that restoring the region to its ordinarily frenetic pace could take days — and that rebuilding the hardest-hit communities and the transportation networks that link them together could take considerably longer.

About 6.5 million homes and businesses were still without power, including 4 million in New York and New Jersey. Electricity was out as far west as Wisconsin and as far south as the Carolinas.

The scale of the challenge could be seen across the Hudson River in New Jersey, where National Guard troops arrived in the heavily flooded city of Hoboken to help evacuate thousands still stuck in their homes and deliver ready-to-eat meals. Live wires dangled in floodwaters that Mayor Dawn Zimmer said were rapidly mixing with sewage.

Thousands of people were still holed up in their brownstones, condos, and other homes in the mile-square city is across the Hudson River from New York.

And new problems arose when firefighters were unable to reach blazes rekindled by natural gas leaks in the heavily hit shore town of Mantoloking. More than a dozen homes were destroyed.

President Barack Obama planned to visit Atlantic City, N.J., which was directly in the storm’s path Monday night and where part of the historic boardwalk washed away.

Gov. Chris Christie said he plans to ask the president to assign the Army Corps of Engineers to work on how to rebuild beaches and find “the best way to rebuild the beach to protect these towns.”

Outages in the state’s two largest cities, Newark and Jersey City, left traffic signals dark, resulting in fender-benders at intersections where police were not directing traffic. At one Jersey City supermarket, there were long lines to get bread and use an electrical outlet to charge cellphones.

Amid the despair, talk of recovery was already beginning.

“It’s heartbreaking after being here 37 years,” Barry Prezioso of Point Pleasant, N.J., said as he returned to his house in the beachfront community to survey the damage. “You see your home demolished like this, it’s tough. But nobody got hurt and the upstairs is still livable, so we can still live upstairs and clean this out. I’m sure there’s people that had worse. I feel kind of lucky.”

As New York began its second day after the megastorm, morning rush-hour traffic was heavy as people started returning to work. There was even a sign of normalcy: commuters waiting at bus stops. School was out for a third day.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks