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In the 2009 semifinals, she was angered by a foot-fault call that resulted in a double-fault, setting up match point for her opponent, Kim Clijsters. Williams brandished her racket at the line judge and got docked match point. Then, two years later, while losing to Sam Stosur in the 2011 final, Williams berated the chair umpire after losing a point for screaming before it had ended.

There was a foot-fault call in this match, too, while Williams was serving at 40-0 while trailing 2-0 in the second set. She didn’t react immediately, but when the game was over, she stared down the lineman while walking to her chair for the changeover. The linesman chuckled a bit. No biggie.

“I’m just happy that she got through this one without any incident and was able to try to forget all that in the past,” said her mom, Oracene Price. “Because I think that was a lot in her mind.”

Also on Williams‘ mind this summer has been her long journey back.

Shortly after winning Wimbledon in 2010, she cut her feet on broken glass while on her way out of a restaurant in Germany. That led to two operations on her right foot. Later, she got clots in her lungs and needed to inject herself with a blood thinner. Those shots led to a pool of blood gathering under her stomach’s skin, requiring another procedure in the hospital.

By the time all that was over, she had been off tour for about 10 months. She returned in 2011.

“She was so disgusted at home. She felt like she was useless. That’s the way it is with athletes, I guess. She couldn’t sit still,” Price said. “She was getting depressed. A lot to overcome.”

She did overcome it, and now she adds another championship to the best resume currently in the game.

She is the first woman to win Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in the same season since 2002, which is when she last did it.

She moved three Grand Slam titles away from a tie for fourth on the all-time list with Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert.

Navratilova was the last thirty-something to win the U.S. Open. Williams, who turns 31 on Sept. 26, joins her on that list.

But Williams does not play, act or talk like a woman nearing the end of her career.

There are a few tournaments to be played this fall on hard court. The next Grand Slam season starts in January in Australia. Williams said “my motivation is up there,” and those who know her feel it, too.

“She’s very, very motivated and feels she can win every tournament,” Mouratoglou said. “If one day she doesn’t feel the same, we’ll see, but for the moment, she feels she can win every tournament she plays, which is true, she can. So, she’s prepared to do everything to do it.”