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PHILLIP LIM

Phillip Lim got the memo on mixed prints, gauzy sheers and bib overalls, but he put his own “cut it up” touch on his 3.1 spring collection, evoking a tension between streetwear and polish.

He colored nubuck overalls and a biker jacket raspberry, pairing them with muscle shirts and T-tops.

Grunge trousers came in a black patchwork and a faded mint pattern combined with a spotted pony print in black, and florals in large and small prints.

“It’s about taking what you have in front of you, cutting it up, not throwing anything away and mixing it up again,” Lim said after the show.

Lim was influenced by the “altered views” of 1920s Dadaists through their inheritors, including the beat writer William S. Burroughs and David Bowie, Kurt Cobain and Radiohead. “But I don’t want it to come off as you’re homeless, so we disguised it and veiled it with sheerness, so there’s an illusion to the sensuality.”

CARMEN MARC VALVO

Carmen Marc Valvo left behind the minimalism and clean lines of fall in favor of flowing glamour in voluminous lace cocktail dresses and red carpet gowns.

Choosing an elegant, all-white venue on Sunday, the spring collection was Asian-inspired in origami folds of organza at the chest and waist, Kimono wrap constructions and yin-yang combinations of Chantilly lace and brocade.

Valvo was inspired by Samurai breast plates when he created panels of glass, square-cut sequins for chest pieces over lace.

“Last fall it was very minimal,” Valvo said after the show. “I’m feeling a little more hopeful right now and I think the collection reflects that. I thought it should be a little more grand, more regal. I wanted volume. I didn’t want to be afraid.”

SKAIST TAYLOR

Pamela Skaist-Levy and Gela Nash-Taylor blow into New York Fashion Week with the Western wind, and they like to stir it up.

Most famous for founding the Juicy Couture brand, the designers are now trying to solidify a following for their more upscale label Skaist Taylor, and they make no excuses for their love of 1970s rock ‘n’ roll glamour. They embrace it even if it’s a look that isn’t leading most of the trends this round of seasonal previews.

Sunday’s show was staged on a Chelsea rooftop with “Witchy Woman” by the Eagles coming out of the speakers. It was the perfect soundtrack for models with frizzed-out hair, candy-colored feather jackets, loose eyelet looks and a metallic leather dress. A cute orange romper was right for the moment, and lingerie-inspired styles are second nature for the woman who likes to stay up late.

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