NFL replacement officials taking heat

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One official was pulled from duty because he’s a fan. Another negated a touchdown without ever throwing a penalty flag. Several others had difficulty with basic rules. 

Upon further review, Week 2 was a poor one for the NFL’s replacement officials.

Coaches and players around the league are losing patience and speaking out against the fill-in officials following a slew of questionable calls in Sunday’s games.

The NFL locked out the regular officials in June after their contract expired. Negotiations with the NFL Referees Association broke down several times during the summer, including just before the season, and the league is using replacements for the first time since 2001.

The results have been a mixed bag.

Just hours before kickoff Sunday, the NFL removed side judge Brian Stropolo from the New Orleans-Carolina game because it was discovered he’s a Saints fan.

And then came the on-field problems.

In Philadelphia’s 24-23 win over Baltimore, two game-altering calls left quarterback Joe Flacco and linebacker Ray Lewis fuming. It appeared on replay both calls were accurate as is. But that didn’t make it any less controversial.

Flacco’s scoring pass to receiver Jacoby Jones in the fourth quarter was called back because of offensive pass interference. The official who made the call didn’t throw the yellow flag, though he immediately signaled a penalty.

“I might sound like a little bit of a baby here,” Flacco said. “But for them to make that call, I think, was a little crazy.”

Despite the public outrage, the league backed the replacement crew, a collection of small college officials who have been studying NFL rules since the summer.

“Officiating is never perfect. The current officials have made great strides and are performing admirably under unprecedented scrutiny and great pressure,” NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said in an Email to The Associated Press. “As we do every season, we will work to improve officiating and are confident that the game officials will show continued improvement.”

While some mistakes were judgment calls — such as a pass interference penalty on Pittsburgh defensive back Ike Taylor in which he appeared to miss a New York Jets receiver — the more egregious errors appear to be misinterpretations of rules.

In the Cleveland-Cincinnati game, the clock continued to run after an incomplete pass by Bengals quarterback Andy Dalton in the second quarter. A total of 29 seconds ticked off, and the Browns ended the half with the ball at their 29. Perhaps an extra half-minute could’ve helped the drive. The Bengals won 34-27.

“Missed calls & bad calls are going to happen,” Browns linebacker Scott Fujita, an NFLPA executive council member, wrote on Twitter. “That’s part of the deal & we can all live with it. But not knowing all the rules and major procedural errors (like allowing the clock to run after an incomplete pass) are completely unacceptable. Enough already.”

The Colts were incorrectly told at the end of their game that accepting an offside penalty would start the clock. So, quarterback Andrew Luck spiked the ball to stop it and set up Adam Vinatieri’s 53-yard field goal that gave Indianapolis a 23-20 win over Minnesota.

Feisty play was a common theme around the league, as well. Players are seemingly getting away with being more physical, especially after the whistle. Officials appear reluctant to call personal fouls, opting instead for offsetting unsportsmanlike penalties that won’t dissuade guys from going after each other as much.

The officials singled out an offender in the final minutes at St. Louis. Washington receiver Josh Morgan reacted after being tackled — and then shoved — by Cortland Finnegan, tossing the ball at the Rams cornerback and drawing an unsportsmanlike penalty. That turned a potential game-tying 47-yard field goal into a 62-yard attempt, which Billy Cundiff missed short.

“I’ve never been a part of a game that was that chippy,” Hall said. “Just so much extracurricular things going on after the play.”

Philadelphia receiver Jason Avant predicted replacement officials would have trouble keeping players in line.

“When you go into a game, you know what things you can do to get away with, with these refs that we have,” Avant said a few days before the season opener. “Guys are going to kind of cheat.”

As a result, Avant and many of his peers are concerned about safety.

“If they’re going to press player safety,” Buffalo center Eric Wood said, “and they’re going to have this multibillion-dollar industry, they should probably try to get something done to keep the product high.”

In 2001, the lockout lasted for one week of the regular season before a settlement was reached. This was the second weekend the replacements were used, and the NFL has drawn up a five-week schedule for using them if the labor dispute is not resolved.

In Week 1, there was one major error, when the officials awarded Seattle an extra timeout in the final minutes of a game at Arizona. The Cardinals held on to win and the crew’s referee admitted the mistake.

“I don’t know if there’s a newfound appreciation or anything like that, but those guys have been doing it for a long time and they put a lot of time and hard work into going out there and doing this and seeing those games,” Flacco said about the regular officials. “It’s not easy to be down there and be officiating games that are going full speed at this level, so that’s my opinion of it.

“It’s tough to just get thrown right in there and be perfect.”

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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