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Garcia said she has been threatened at least eight times and has called the FBI but she hasn’t heard back from federal agents.

Armenta argued in court that her client was used a puppet to make the film, and she was clearly defrauded and lied to by the people behind the movie.

“She did not sign on to be a bigot,” Armenta said.

Timothy Alger, the lawyer representing Google at Thursday’s hearing, said the company shouldn’t be responsible for what transpired between Garcia and the filmmakers. He said no matter how someone views the content “it is something of widespread debate.”

YouTube has blocked users in Saudi Arabia, Libya and Egypt from viewing the clip, as well as Indonesia and India, because it violates laws in those countries.

Garcia could seek to have a judge grant an injunction against Nakoula to order him to remove the video, but it wouldn’t accomplish what Garcia set out to do.

“It would have little to no effect because other websites are showing the film,” Reynolds said. “It would be a moot point.”

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AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney contributed to this story.