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And so ends the most successful year yet in the FedEx Cup — four wildly entertaining playoff events packed with the biggest names, even if the No. 1 player in the world wound up at No. 2.

“I’m a little disappointed, but at the same time, Brandt really deserves to win,” McIlroy said. “He played the best golf out of anyone. He knew what he needed to do. He needed to come in here and win. He controlled his own destiny, just like I did. And he was able to come and do that. So because of that, he really deserves it.”

How can Snedeker explain winning the FedEx Cup over a player who won twice during the playoffs?

“Life is all about timing,” he said, grinning.

Snedeker, who finished on 10-under 270, won for the fourth time in his career and moved into the top 10 in the world for the first time.

It also was his first time winning with a share of the lead going into the last day. In his previous three wins, he came from five shots, six shots and seven shots behind, the latter at Torrey Pines this year.

That’s what made Sunday feel more valuable than the cash. That’s what he takes to the Ryder Cup next week at Medinah, where no one can question why U.S. captain Davis Love III picked him for the team.

“I’m a lot better under pressure than I gave myself credit for,” Snedeker said. “I learned that over the last four weeks. I’ve had a lot of pressure the last four weeks and a bunch of different stuff going on in my life. To be able to focus in and do what I did was pretty impressive.”

Snedeker joins Woods (twice), Vijay Singh, Jim Furyk and Bill Haas as winners of the FedEx Cup in its six-year history.

It was an emotional week in so many ways for Snedeker, already a high-strung personality. His father, Larry, flew in to watch final round at East Lake, only the second tournament he has attended since having a liver transplant last year. And then came the visit with Tucker.

“It just made me realize … as much as I made today out be important, how unimportant it really is,” he said. “It got me focused on the small stuff, which I did a great job of doing today.”

But he delivered some big shots — a 40-foot birdie putt on No. 8, just two holes after he dumped his tee shot into the water on the par-3 sixth and made double bogey; the 18-foot birdie putt on No. 13 that gave him momentum on the back nine; and a chip-in for birdie from short of the 17th green that effectively clinched it.

“I had complete confidence in what I was doing,” Snedeker said.

Rose was within one shot on the back nine, but he never caught up after Snedeker’s big birdie on the 13th. Rose will look back on the final round and regret a series of missed putts, mostly for birdies and one for par, all of them costly. He missed four putts inside 10 feet.

“He’s mentally tough, Brandt,” Rose said. “It’s kind of a different pressure, playing for $10 million. It gets in your head more than other golf tournaments. Other golf tournaments, it’s more routine. But this week, it’s not routine. We talk about it all year long, and suddenly you have to walk the walk. And he did a great job of that today.”

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