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The two city councilmen who opposed the deal, Richard Conlin and Nick Licata, said that while it might be good as far as stadium deals go, that doesn’t mean it’s a good use of public money. Conlin said that when new businesses typically move into the city, the taxes they generate are a benefit to the city. In this case, he said, the city is giving away $200 million in tax revenue up front, only to collect it back later on.

Licata said professional sports franchises aren’t like nonprofit cultural organizations like operas or symphonies, which don’t threaten to skip town when money’s tight.

“What some citizens see is that those who have a lot of money are using public resources to get more money,” he said.