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The clincher came on the 17th, when Snedeker chipped in from the front of the green to take a four-shot lead into the final hole. He never looked at a leaderboard all day. He was unaware that Moore finished with three straight bogeys, and only figured he had a comfortable margin against Rose.

In his worst swing of the day, Snedeker hammered a hybrid into the grandstands on the 18th, leading to a meaningless bogey.

There were times when golf could have felt meaningless. Snedeker had to miss five tournaments this summer, including the U.S. Open, with a rib injury that might have cost him a chance at making the Ryder Cup team. U.S. captain Davis Love III picked him anyway because he wanted good putters.

If there were any questions about that pick, Snedeker answered them.

“He’s looking pretty good, yeah,” Woods said.

More than his own small injury, Snedeker endured a year in which his father had a liver transplant. More recently, the son of his swing coach suffered critical injuries in a car crash. Tucker Anderson, in a responsive coma, was transferred to an Atlanta hospital, and Snedeker went by to see him Sunday morning.

The teen couldn’t speak, but the message came through.

“I asked him if he thought I was going to beat Rory McIlroy, and he gave me a wink,” Snedeker said.

Equally impressive as his win was how Snedeker handled the notion of an $11.44 million payday ($1 million of the FedEx Cup bonus goes into his retirement fund). He called a sum that size “like winning the lottery,” before explaining a little bit more about who he is and how he was raised.

His father always taught him not to buy anything he couldn’t pay for, and Snedeker has followed the instruction. He has a house in Nashville, Tenn., that he said was “not grandiose.” He still drives the SUV he bought after he made it to the PGA Tour six years ago.

“I’m not by any means a flashy guy,” he said. “Of anybody that I know, I do not need $11 million. So there are going to be things we can do to really help people. So that’s the way I look at it. This is unbelievable to be financially stable for the rest of my career. As long as I’m not an idiot, I should be fine, really. I really think we can make a difference and help a lot of people out in Nashville and Tennessee and the surrounding areas.”

Next up is a tournament that doesn’t pay a dime. Snedeker was headed to Chicago on Monday for his first Ryder Cup. A performance like this can only help.

“I’m not under any illusion of being calm next week,” he said. “I know it’s going to be a very pressure-packed week. But I am going to use today as a huge thing to fall back on next week. I played against the best in the world this week for 72 holes and I beat them.”

At just the right time.