Nation Briefs: Police: Student kills self at Oklahoma junior high

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STILLWATER, Okla. — A gunshot rang out at an Oklahoma junior high school before classes began Wednesday, terrifying teenagers who feared a gunman was on the loose.

Soon, though, students learned no one else was in danger. One of their eighth-grade classmates had taken his own life, shooting himself in the head with a handgun in the hall, authorities said.

Staffers quickly locked down the building and evacuated the rest of the school’s 700 eighth- and ninth-graders, along with students from an adjacent elementary school, police Capt. Randy Dickerson said.

Capt. Dickerson said the 13-year-old didn’t leave a note, and authorities said they don’t know why he killed himself. Superintendent Ann Caine, who oversees the district about 70 miles west of Tulsa, said there weren’t any reports that the teen had been bullied.

NORTH DAKOTA

NCAA agreement allows some Sioux logos to stay

BISMARCK — The NCAA has approved a plan that allows most American Indian imagery to remain in the privately owned athletic complex housing University of North Dakota hockey and basketball.

The State Board of Higher Education ordered the university this summer to drop its Fighting Sioux nickname to abide by a 2007 agreement with the NCAA.

That agreement had called for all Sioux logos to be removed from the Ralph Engelstad Arena and the attached Betty Engelstad Sioux Center. But the facilities have thousands of Indian-head logos, including on brass medallions on chairs and a 10-foot sketch in the hockey arena’s granite floor.

The new agreement allows those to stay, though six “Home of the Fighting Sioux” signs must be removed.

University President Robert Kelley says it’s a good resolution.

NEW MEXICO

Police chief’s resignation leaves sniffer dog in charge

VAUGHN — The police chief of the small eastern New Mexico town of Vaughn resigned Wednesday, leaving the town with just one certified member on its police force — a drug-sniffing dog named Nikka.

Dave Romero, attorney for the town, said Wednesday that Police Chief Ernest “Chris” Armijo decided to step down after news stories reported that he wasn’t allowed to carry a gun because of his criminal background.

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