World Briefs: Anti-Islam video clips banned from YouTube

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BRAZIL

Anti-Islam video clips banned from YouTube

RIO DE JANEIRO | A judge in Brazil has ordered YouTube to remove clips of the movie that has touched off deadly protests across the Muslim world, the court said in a statement.

Judge Gilson Delgado Miranda gave the video-sharing site 10 days to remove videos of the film, “Innocence of Muslims.”

After that, YouTube’s parent company, Google, will face fines of $5,000 a day for every day the clips remain accessible in Brazil, according to the statement posted on the court’s website late Tuesday.

The lawsuit was filed by a group representing Brazil’s Muslim community, the National Union of Islamic Entities, which claims the video violates Brazil’s constitutional guarantee of religious freedom for all faiths.

In a statement on the group’s website, Mohamad al Bukai, the head of religious matters for the Sao Paulo-based group, hailed the ruling as a victory.

“Freedom of expression must not be confused with giving disproportionate and irresponsible offense, which can provoke serious consequences for society,” Mr. al Bukai said.

Iran

President’s press aide jailed for publications

TEHRAN | President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s top press adviser has been taken into custody to serve a six-month jail sentence after he was convicted of “publishing materials contrary to Islamic norms.”

Ali Akbar Javanfekr, who is also the head of the state-run IRNA news agency, is one of dozens of Mr. Ahmadinejad’s allies detained since April 2011 after the president briefly challenged an order from the country’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, over the choice of intelligence chief.

The semiofficial Fars news agency said security officers from the Tehran prosecutor’s office detained Mr. Javanfekr on Wednesday. IRNA said Mr. Javanfekr was arrested as Mr. Ahmadinejad began his speech at the U.N. General Assembly in New York

An Iranian court convicted Mr. Javanfekr in November and banned him from journalism activities for three years.

Netherlands

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