You are currently viewing the printable version of this article, to return to the normal page, please click here.

Ryder Cup 2012: Tournament missing mystique

No surprises on Europe’s roster

- The Washington Times - Thursday, September 27, 2012

MEDINAH, Ill. — The question used to come up every other year when the Americans began looking ahead to the Ryder Cup.

"Who's their Peter Baker?"

Europe always had at least one player the Americans didn't know anything about until losing to him. Baker played in only one Ryder Cup, going 3-1 in 1993 and winning a singles match against Corey Pavin, one of the toughest guys to beat in match play.

Those days are gone. As golf has expanded its borders, the Ryder Cup no longer has any mystery guests.

Eight of the Europeans have joint membership on the PGA Tour, and all eight have homes in Florida. Luke Donald of England, who has the best winning percentage of anyone at Medinah, lives about 45 minutes away on the north side of Chicago. The only Ryder Cup rookie for Europe is Nicolas Colsaerts, the big hitter from Belgium. With the majors and World Golf Championships, he already has played eight times in America this year and has been invited to play in a PGA Tour event in two weeks in California.

There are no surprises in this Ryder Cup, only stars.

"Both teams are pretty much even, and it's going to be a close match," European captain Jose Maria Olazabal said. "I don't see any favorites."

When the matches get under way Friday at Medinah, they will feature the two strongest teams in the 85-year history of the Ryder Cup. The entire 12-man team for the United States was part of the 30-man field at the Tour Championship last week in Atlanta, joined by five of the seven Europeans who were eligible.

For the first time, the 24 players from both sides are among the top 35 in the world ranking.

Europe has four major champions and four players who have been No. 1 in the world. Three of the four rookies for the U.S. team have won majors in the past 13 months -- Keegan Bradley, Bubba Watson and Webb Simpson. The Americans have experience at the top -- Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Jim Furyk collectively have played in 21 Ryder Cups and 90 matches. The Europeans have experience where it matters -- winning.

It all starts to unfold Friday morning before a raucous crowd in the Chicago suburbs with a Ryder Cup that has all the trappings of a heavyweight prize fight.

About the only thing missing has been fodder for the tabloids. Familiarity in this event is breeding civility, not contempt.

"This is not a war. It's a golf match," U.S. captain Davis Love III said. "It's a friendly golf match."

It wasn't always that way, especially when Europe began to win and then the Americans started to care. Seve Ballesteros was the spiritual leader of those European teams, using the Ryder Cup as a chance for them to prove they were not second-class citizens.

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.