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1. GENE SARAZEN IN 1935

Gene Sarazen was about the only player who didn’t think the second edition of the Masters was over. Craig Wood was in the clubhouse at 6-under 282. Sarazen was in the fairway on the par-5 15th hole, three shots behind while playing with Walter Hagen.

Sarazen had a 4-wood that he called his “Dodo” club, and while he didn’t have a great lie, thought he should go for the green from 235 yards away. He tried to play it slightly off the toe to get a little extra distance, and the shot came off perfectly.

The ball bounced just short of the green, hopped on and rolled into the cup for an albatross. Sarazen closed with three pars to force a playoff, and he beat Wood over 36 holes the next day.

It remains the most important shot in tournament history because it put the Masters on the map.