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Think Lindsey Vonn was going to pull her new boyfriend aside and tell him not to play?

It wasn’t just that Woods played, because the argument could certainly be made that a two-shot penalty was punishment enough. It was that he chose to ignore any of the conversation about how what the best player in the world was doing might not be good for the game he has dominated.

His weekend interviews were an exercise in banality. He never came close to addressing how controversial his drop on 15 had become. Listen to him after his closing round of 70, when he was asked what he would take away from his week.

“That I played well,” Woods said. “I certainly missed my share of putts today, actually the week. I also made a bunch, too. So it’s one of those things where the golf course was playing a little bit tricky.”

Luckily, Woods was gone by the time Scott canned a 20-foot putt on the 18th green to all but lock up his first major title. He was likely already headed for his private jet when Angel Cabrera stiffed it to 3 feet to force the Masters into a playoff.

And presumably he was in the air when Scott ran in a 12-footer on the second hole to win a playoff and become the first Australian to win the Masters.

He and caddie Stevie Williams _ who was on the bag for 13 of Woods‘ majors _ celebrated just like Woods and Williams had celebrated so many times before. But then something happened that doesn’t happen when Woods wins majors.

Cabrera and Scott walked off the green, their arms locked around each other’s shoulders. They had battled to the end and only one could wear the green jacket, but they were linked together in something bigger

They were class acts in a gentleman’s game.

And that’s something Woods never seems to get.

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Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg(at)ap.org or http://twitter.com/timdahlberg