Yovani Gallardo arrested for DUI; Brewers pitcher’s blood-alcohol was 0.22

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MILWAUKEE — Milwaukee Brewers pitcher Yovani Gallardo was arrested on a drunken-driving charge Tuesday after authorities say he was driving on a city highway with a blood-alcohol content nearly three times the legal limit.

Deputies responded about 2 a.m. to a report of a possibly intoxicated driver, Milwaukee County sheriff’s spokeswoman Fran McLaughlin said. She said a caller reported seeing a driver repeatedly swerving between lanes, and deputies spotted Gallardo driving alone at 40 mph in a 55-mph zone.

“He was very cooperative,” McLaughlin said. “He said he had a couple of beers.”

The arrest report says Gallardo had red glassy eyes, slurred speech and an odor of alcohol, and that he failed field-sobriety tests.

Authorities say a breath test revealed a blood-alcohol level of 0.22, nearly three times the legal limit of 0.08, and the reading was matched by a second breath test following his arrest.

The Brewers issued a statement saying they were aware of Gallardo’s situation.

“We have expressed our disappointment to him and know he understands that behavior of this nature is of great concern to everyone in the organization,” the statement said. “Yovani has acknowledged the seriousness of this incident and is taking full accountability for his actions.”

Gallardo spoke to reporters at Miller Park on Tuesday before the Brewers prepared to open a three-game series with the San Francisco Giants.

“You obviously know why I’m here,” Gallardo said. “What happened last night, I made a bad decision. I made a mistake and I’m sure I lost a lot of respect from the fans and I just want to apologize to the fans, my teammates, my family.

“Like I said, it’s just a bad call. Something I shouldn’t have done. I regret it. At this point, obviously, there’s nothing I can do about it now. It happened. I just want to apologize to the whole organization and the people of Milwaukee for my actions. It’s just … it’s not very easy. It’s one of those things… I truly am sorry.

“I’m going to make sure something like this never happens again. Whatever circumstances, consequences … whatever I have to do so this won’t happen again, I’m going to do it.”

Gallardo did not take questions from reporters.

“I don’t know how long it’s going to take to get this cleared up; the whole situation that happened,” Gallardo said. “The main thing, like I said, I came out here to apologize. Especially to the people that look up to me. Obviously, it’s something that I regret. I’m going to make sure it never happens again.”

In Wisconsin, first-offense drunken driving is a citation, not a misdemeanor or felony charge. McLaughlin said Gallardo faces nearly $800 in fines for drunken driving and for unsafe driving.

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