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Now, competition organizers can choose whether decisions are shown to fans on big screens in stadiums and television viewers. In tennis and cricket, anticipation of a decision provided by Hawk-Eye has become part of the experience.

“It’s not secret,” Blatter said after the IFAB meeting in Edinburgh, Scotland. “Once we have the technology and it shows it’s a goal or not a goal, we have to be transparent, otherwise there’s no need to do it.”

Referees still have the final say on awarding a goal, or even using goal-line technology when it is installed. Mandatory pre-game tests give match officials the option to switch off the technology if they doubt its accuracy that day.

Hawk-Eye, GoalRef and Cairos will try to persuade other soccer clients, such as the English Premier League or German’s Bundesliga, to choose their systems before next season begins in August.