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Tampa Bay, which was more than $32 million under the salary cap, was thought to be the most likely suitor.

“We felt it was one of those win-win situations for both organizations,” Dominik said.

Nevertheless, talks between the Bucs GM and new Jets general manager John Idzik dragged on for a couple of months. Negotiations heated up when Tampa Bay insisted a deal be in place a minimum of a week before the start of the draft.

The teams agreed to compensation last Thursday. Dominik then received permission to contact Revis‘ agents to begin discussions on a long-term contract and eventually flew the cornerback to town for a physical on Sunday.

Revis said he met Idzik for the first time last week and that the Jets GM told him he wanted the cornerback to remain in New York.

Asked if he felt Idzik had been untruthful, Revis said: “Yeah. … I felt that type of vibe.”

At the same time, the seventh-year pro said he’s not bitter about how his stay in New York ended. He admitted he “felt some type of way” when he learned the Jets were willing to trade him, but insisted he’s not upset.

“It’s over. It happens. I’ve got to move on. It’s a new chapter in my life,” Revis said. “I don’t have a sour taste in my mouth. Not at all.”

Instead, the cornerback said he’s focused on doing everything he can to get back on the field and help his new team.

The Bucs, 7-9 a year ago, haven’t made the playoffs since 2007. They haven’t won a postseason game since winning their only Super Bowl in 2002.

Revis hardly considers himself a savior.

He said he’s joining a talented team with a playoff-caliber roster even without him, citing quarterback Josh Freeman, receiver Vincent Jackson and running back Doug Martin by name. Jackson and Martin made the Pro Bowl last season, and Freeman is coming off a year in which he became Tampa Bay’s first 4,000-yard passer.

“I can go down the list of players we have on this team. We have some great guys. That was one of the things me and my (agents) looked at to be part of this organization. We have some guys who can already play,” Revis said.

Schiano, beginning his second season, agreed.

“He doesn’t have to do it alone,” said Schiano, who coached against Revis when the cornerback was in college at Pittsburgh and Sciano was at Rutgers. “He has a good supporting cast.”

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