Emotional connection to repairs on National Cathedral

  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso looks up at a spire that broke apart and damaged the roof of the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso looks up at a spire that broke apart and damaged the roof of the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso points to spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso points to spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off pieces of the original spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 and their newly carved replacements which sit inside the base of the central tower before they are repositioned on the outside of the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off pieces of the original spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 and their newly carved replacements which sit inside the base of the central tower before they are repositioned on the outside of the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off the head of a gargoyle and others pieces of stone that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off the head of a gargoyle and others pieces of stone that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Jeanette Gregory of Prince William County, Va., center, take a photo of pieces of a stone spire that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Jeanette Gregory of Prince William County, Va., center, take a photo of pieces of a stone spire that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • The head of a gargoyle and others pieces of stone that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 are on display at the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)The head of a gargoyle and others pieces of stone that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 are on display at the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Champagne bottles dating back decades are on display inside the base of the central tower of the Washington National Cathedral during a tour on damage caused by the 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Former Head Stone Carver Vince Palumbo and his crew saved a bottle from each New Year celebration. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Champagne bottles dating back decades are on display inside the base of the central tower of the Washington National Cathedral during a tour on damage caused by the 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Former Head Stone Carver Vince Palumbo and his crew saved a bottle from each New Year celebration. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Champagne bottles dating back decades are on display inside the base of the central tower of the Washington National Cathedral during a tour on damage caused by the 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Former Head Stone Carver Vince Palumbo and his crew saved a bottle from each New Year celebration. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Champagne bottles dating back decades are on display inside the base of the central tower of the Washington National Cathedral during a tour on damage caused by the 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Former Head Stone Carver Vince Palumbo and his crew saved a bottle from each New Year celebration. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off pieces of the original spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 and their newly carved replacements which sit inside the base of the central tower before they are repositioned on the outside of the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows off pieces of the original spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 and their newly carved replacements which sit inside the base of the central tower before they are repositioned on the outside of the cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Sections of spires on the Washington National Cathedral remain missing and damaged from the a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Sections of spires on the Washington National Cathedral remain missing and damaged from the a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso points to spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso points to spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Sections of spires on the Washington National Cathedral remain damaged from the a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Sections of spires on the Washington National Cathedral remain damaged from the a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso stands on scaffolding which has been constructed to repair spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso stands on scaffolding which has been constructed to repair spires that broke off the Washington National Cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso stands on scaffolding which has been constructed to repair spires on the Washington National Cathedral which were damaged during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso stands on scaffolding which has been constructed to repair spires on the Washington National Cathedral which were damaged during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • A section of patched roof is visible through a row of spires on the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Sections of the roof were damaged from falling pieces of the cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)A section of patched roof is visible through a row of spires on the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Sections of the roof were damaged from falling pieces of the cathedral during a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011 (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso runs his hand along a large chip of stone still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso runs his hand along a large chip of stone still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Large cracks like this one can be seen in many areas on the Washington National Cathedral which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Large cracks like this one can be seen in many areas on the Washington National Cathedral which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows a large crack still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso shows a large crack still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • The profile of Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso is visible through a large crack in the exterior still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)The profile of Head Stone Mason Joe Alonso is visible through a large crack in the exterior still in need of repair on the exterior of the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carver Sean Callahan works on repairing a section of the North east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carver Sean Callahan works on repairing a section of the North east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carver Sean Callahan works on repairing a section of the North east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carver Sean Callahan works on repairing a section of the North east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo on the top of  scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo on the top of scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo as they make their way down scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo as they make their way down scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
  • Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan, left, and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo on the top of  scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Cathedral Stone Mason/Stone Carvers Sean Callahan, left, and Andy Uhl, right, pose for a photo on the top of scaffolding constructed on the north east corner of the Apse, the eastern most point of the Washington National Cathedral, Washington, D.C., Monday, April 22, 2013. Repairs continue on the Washington National Cathedral, which sustained millions of dollars worth of damage from a 5.8 magnitude earthquake in August of 2011(Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)
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“The damage was pretty significant,” Mr. Alonso said. “But I always go back to the thought that if the quake had lasted a few seconds longer, we would have lost a tremendous amount more stones.”

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