LAMBRO: Keystone Kops to Egypt’s rescue

Confused Mideast policy leaves Team Obama running in circles

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Since Egypt’s military arrested Mr. Morsi and took over his government, the Obama administration has waffled over whether a coup had taken place. At one point, Mr. Kerry told the press in Pakistan that the military was merely “restoring democracy.” When that remark sparked an uproar from the Muslim Brotherhood, Mr. Kerry backed away from his remark, calling for all sides “to get back to a new normal” — whatever that is.

The administration’s Keystone Kops-style handling of the crisis, stumbling from one mixed message to another, has drawn condemnation and ridicule across the foreign-policy community. Efforts to navigate its way through the violent military crackdown were “complicated by what many Egyptians see as mixed and confusing messages coming from Washington, exacerbating already high anti-American sentiment and threatening broader U.S. goals in the region,” the Associated Press reported last week.

This regionwide crisis called for skillful statecraft and experienced presidential leadership, both of which have been AWOL in Washington ever since the bloodshed in Egypt began.

Donald Lambro is a syndicated columnist and contributor to The Washington Times.

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About the Author
Donald Lambro

Donald Lambro

Donald Lambro is the chief political correspondent for The Washington Times, the author of five books and a nationally syndicated columnist. His twice-weekly United Feature Syndicate column appears in newspapers across the country, including The Washington Times. He received the Warren Brookes Award For Excellence In Journalism in 1995 and in that same year was the host and co-writer of ...

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