California porn industry shuts down for HIV-infected actress

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The adult film industry in San Fernando Valley in California announced a moratorium on porn filmmaking Wednesday after an actress tested positive for HIV.

Previous sex partners of the woman, who goes by the name Cameron Bay, are currently being tested. The Daily Mail reported Wednesday that disgraced congressman Anthony Weiner’s sexting partner Sydney Leathers is among those being tested, who recently shot a scene with Xander Corvus, who shot a scene with Miss Bay not too long before that.


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Miss Bay told Adult Video News that she was “obviously extremely distraught and in disbelief,” and that an additional test will be conducted to confirm the result.

The Free Speech Coalition, the Canoga Park-based trade group for the adult-film industry, called for the moratorium, the Los Angeles Daily News reported.

“We are following established protocols for the protection of the performers,” said Diane Duke, executive director for the Free Speech Coalition.

The moratorium is voluntary, but the bigger players in the industry generally work with the coalition, the report said.

“Adult film producers and performers are cooperative and compliant with these requests, especially keeping in mind the safety and health of performers,” Miss Duke said. “Moratoriums have lasted various lengths of time, from a few days to a few weeks; in the current situation, we are expecting the moratorium to last for a few days.”

“The moratorium will be lifted once the risk of transmission has been eliminated,” she added.

Miss Bay is reported to have shot her most recent sex scene with Corvus, the man who played Anthony Weiner alongside Leathers in her porn debut “Weiner And Me,” released Wednesday, the Daily Mail reported.

In a statement to the Mail, Leathers said both she and Corvus tested healthy prior to shooting, although the presence of STDs sometimes does not come up in tests for up to three months after exposure.

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