- Associated Press - Monday, August 5, 2013

PITTSFORD, N.Y. (AP) - Phil Mickelson was elated. Tiger Woods was frustrated. Lee Westwood was trying to pretend he wasn’t disheartened.

That was the British Open. That was only 15 days ago.

Time to move on to the next major. Monday was the first official day of practice for the PGA Championship, which feels more like the next page than a new chapter.

“They come fast and quick once the U.S. Open hits,” Graeme McDowell said.

No need explaining that to Ernie Els. He is playing for the seventh time in the last nine weeks, three of them major championships.

And no need complaining to Jack Nicklaus. He had it far worse.

In his second year as a professional, already a Masters and U.S. Open champion, Nicklaus had his first good shot at winning the British Open until he stumbled down the stretch at Royal Lytham & St. Annes and finished one shot behind Bob Charles.

Ten days later, he won his first PGA Championship.

“They used to have the British Open and the PGA back-to-back, which was really kind of silly,” Nicklaus said. “I was fortunate to be able to get back.”

He was equally fortunate to be 23 with a strong body and a clear mind. One week, Nicklaus was playing links golf with a small golf ball in temperatures in the mid-50s in the northwest of England. The next week he was playing the final American major at Dallas Athletic Club, where the temperatures topped 100.

“It was a big change,” Nicklaus said. “I think a lot of the guys got back, and I think they were probably pretty tired from the British Open and I think they were pretty tired from … the weather just absolutely beat them down. I guess I was a young guy and I handled those conditions pretty well.”

That was 50 years ago. So maybe now, having a whole two weeks between majors, represents progress.

But the PGA Championship can do better _ not only for the players, but for the marketing of a major that lags well behind the other three in popularity.

McDowell was trying to pay a compliment to the PGA Championship last year at Firestone when the truth got in the way. Asked about the final major of the year, he said, “There’s not a guy standing on the range that wouldn’t put it head-and-shoulders over any tournament in the world _ apart from the other three major championships.”

Perhaps that’s because the other three majors have such a clear identity.

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