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Benghazi truth-seekers use billboards to push Boehner

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A group aiming to bring truth to the American public about the Benghazi terrorist attack is poised to run full-size billboards in House Speaker John Boehner's congressional district with a blunt message: Set up a special investigative committee.

The billboards — the brainchild of Special Operations Speaks — will include photos of Mr. Boehner, former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell above a caption that reads, "If four members of Congress were killed in Benghazi, would we have a Watergate style select committee today?"

The billboards will also include a suggestion for voters to call their congressional representatives and demand the immediate appointment of members to a special investigative committee. What's missing from the talk on Benghazi, the group says, is a full understanding of what was going on in Washington and in Libya before, during and after the attack that left four Americans dead.

"We know this is a bold step and it may raise some well-coiffed hairs on the back of John Boehner's neck," said SOS co-founder Larry Bailey, a former Navy SEAL. "But the fact is that he, and he alone, is blocking a full scale Watergate-style investigation of one of the deadliest scandals in U.S. history — a scandal that reaches into the inner sanctum of the Oval Office."

Rep. Frank Wolf, Virginia Republican, has been trying since January to see his resolution to establish an independent committee to investigate the consulate attack brought to the House floor for a vote. But Mr. Boehner has not allowed it on the floor, despite its cosponsor support of 163 members, the group claims.

Larry Ward, political director of the group, said moving the measure to the floor should be a simple matter.

"We need 218 or 1 to form a select committee," he said. "We need 218 House members to sign the discharge petition — or one speaker of the House to come to his senses."

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