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“To be honest with you, the buzz is that there was absolutely nothing in the report that was new news. Guys who have been around knew everything in the report was happening for the last eight years,” Battier said. “So that’s sort of the irony. There was a big hub-bub about it nationwide, but players were like, `Yeah, I heard that. Doesn’t surprise me, it’s accurate.’”

Hunter, 70, has said he looks forward to continuing in his position and recently made changes based on the review’s findings such as instituting an anti-nepotism policy. He fired his daughter, Robyn, announced daughter-in-law Megan Inaba would leave after the All-Star game, and said the union would no longer use a financial institution that employs his son.

Hunter received a contract extension in 2010 to run through at least through 2015, yet the review said the players would have “powerful arguments” if an attempt to remove him led to litigation. It said Hunter was aware by at least November 2011 that the executive committee and player representatives had not approved the deal according to union bylaws.

“We believe his contract is valid and we will soon offer a comprehensive rebuttal and explanation with respect to the allegations mentioned in the letter and report,” Ashley said.

Fisher is not currently on an NBA team, having asked the Dallas Mavericks for his release earlier this season. The statement said he will be on site at the NBPA office in New York to assist during the transition.

“We ask for the cooperation, trust and patience of the players, their representatives and some of our hard-working NBPA staff as we navigate through this situation,” he said. “But rest assured that our goal is to do what is right for the players and we will emerge stronger than before.”